Map Cataloging
(Approved for use 8 December 2004)

General Policies | Select MARC Fields | Select Rules | Notes | Access Points | Genre/Form Headings

 

GENERAL POLICIES

Cartographic material, including maps, atlases and globes, for the Beinecke Library which receive original cataloging are cataloged according to the latest full national standards for descriptive cataloging. The national standards are the latest revision of Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, 2nd ed., commonly known as AACR2, as interpreted by the Library of Congress rule interpretations (LCRI), and Cartographic Materials: A Manual of Interpretation for AACR2, 2002 Revision (2003). The latest editions of AACR2, the Library of Congress rule interpretations are all available through Cataloger's Desktop. Cartographic Materials is available in the Rare Book Team area.

When appropriate, catalogers should also consult Rare, Antiquarian, or Just Plain Old: Cataloging Pre-twentieth Century Cartographic Resources (2007), located in both the team area and Technical Services in the Beinecke.

Also see the Catalog and Metadata Services documentation on full-level cataloging for field-by-field instructions.

A good on-line resource for cataloging cartographic material is the Map Cataloger's Toolbox.

For cataloging maps in books, see the documentation Maps in Books.

For atlases that are not an atlas factice, see the Atlases cataloging instructions.

For cataloging atlas factices, see the Atlas factices cataloging instructions.

 

SELECT MARC FIELDS

Fixed Fields

In the Header, "Type of Record" should be e: Printed cartographic material. This applies both for maps and for atlases.

Variable Data Fields

In the 007, Physical Description Field (listed as a Fixed Field but appears in the record with variables), the "Map" selection should be applied, with the "Specific Material Designation" coded j: map. The remainder of the fields are usually coded as follows:

Color = | : No attempt to code (for pre-1850 material, if map is hand-colored, it will be noted in a 590 note; for post-1850 material, note in 300 field)

Physical Medium = usually coded a: Paper

Type of Reproduction = code n: Not applicable

Production/Reproduction Detail = code z: Other

Positive/Negative Aspect = code n: Not applicable

In the 008 field, always note relief description, if applicable. Examples of techniques for showing relief can be found between pages 7-6 and 7-7 in the Cartographic Materials manual.


034 - Coded Cartographic Mathematical Data

This field contains cartographic mathematical data, including scale, projection, and/or coordinates in coded form. Field 034 is based on information from field 255 (Cartographic Mathematical Data). Scale and coordinates are recorded in the bibliographic record in two places: in the 034 and the 255 fields.Always include both the scale and the coordinates in the 034 and 255 fields.

For explicit instructions in how to calculate scale and determine coordinates, see Chapter 3: Mathematical and Other Material Specific Details of Cartographic Materials and Appendix B "Guidelines to Determine Scale & Coordinates."

RBT will follow CMS and Map Dept. policies and procedures concerning the proper formatting of scale and coordinates in the 034:

Scale - enter scale given in 255 without spaces or commas.

Coordinates - enter in decimal degrees (ddd.dddddd [hemisphere-degrees.decimal degrees]). Use the minus sign ("-") for S and W. To convert latitude and longitude between decimal degrees and degrees, use the following utility: http://www.fcc.gov/mb/audio/bickel/DDDMMSS-decimal.html.

034 1   ‡a a ‡b 590000 ‡d -110.000000 ‡e -053.000000 ‡f 042.000000 ‡g 003.000000

255     ‡a Scale [ca. 1:590,000] ‡c (W 110°0ʹ0ʺ--W 53°0ʹ0ʺ/N 42°0ʹ0ʺ--N 3°0ʹ0ʺ).

043 - Geographic Area Code

If a geographic area code is found in copy, keep in record. Otherwise, do not supply a geographic area code.

255 - Cartographic Mathematical Data

This field contains mathematical data associated with cartographic material, including a statement of scale, statement of projection and/or a statement of bounding coordinates.

SELECT RULES

Physical Description | Notes | From/Appears In Notes

Early letter forms and transcription

Transcribe early letter forms according to section 0G. Transcription and Appendix G. Early Letter Forms and Symbols in DCRM(B).


300 - Physical Description

Dimensions

Measure both the size of the map, to the nearest millimeter expressed in tenths of a centimeter, as measured by the neat lines (which enclose the details of the map) and the size of the whole sheet on which the map is printed. See rule 5D1. in Cartographic materials for further details and examples (e.g., when the map details go beyond the neat lines). If the map is folded, give the folded dimensions.

The measurement of the neat lines is given in the 300 field. The measurement of the whole sheet (including folded, if folded) is given in the 590 field.

Examples:

300:: ... 23.5 x 26.8 cm.

590: Sheet measures 26.2 x 28.5 cm.

300:: ... 62.5 x 40.9 cm.

590:: Sheet measures 66.7 x 44.3 cm, folded to 33.1 x 22.4 cm.

 

500 - NOTES

Copy Specific Notes

Copy specific notes are made to record important information pertaining to individual copies but not to all copies. This information is often noted on the accompanying accessions slip. Information about provenance evidence, imperfections, and bindings (including bound-with information) pertaining to the copy in hand but not to all copies is recorded in copy specific notes.

Restriction on access notes (506) precede copy specific notes (590). All other notes follow. Restriction on access notes (506) and copy specific notes (590) always begin with BEIN [call no.]: Line-breaks in call numbers are indicated by spaces.

If the copy specific information is not extensive, a single 590 note per copy suffices. For clarity's sake, several copy specific notes for the same copy may be made, each beginning with BEIN [call no.]. In general note the copy specific information in the order given below.

Order of notes

Restricted

Restriction on access

Copy Specific Notes

Bibliographical variants (590 in combination with 500)
Imperfections (590)
Copy number of limited edition (590)
Hand Colored (for pre-1850 material)
Sheet Dimensions (including folded) (590)
Provenance (590)
Binding information (590)
Bound-with notes(590)
In case with notes (590)
Manuscript material in printed works (590)
Material shelved separately (590)

General Notes

Bibliographical variants (500 sometimes in combination with 590)
Relief Note (500)
Bar Scale (500)
From/Appears In (500)
Citations of standard bibliographies (510)
Summary note (520)

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Example

590     ‡a SMLMAPL 855 1827A: Hand col. Sheet measures 44.9 x 56.2 cm.

 

If relief is present on the map, always add a 500 relief description note if not already in record.

Example

500     ‡a Relief shown by hachures.

Examples of techniques for showing relief can be found between pages 7-6 and 7-7 in the Cartographic Materials manual.

 

For pre-1850 material, always add a 500 giving the units of measure used on the item (when found on the item).

Examples

500     ‡a Graphic scale in toise de Paris.

500     ‡a Bar scale given in "statute miles 69 1/2 to a degree," and "sea leagues 20 in a degree."

 

Source of Map (From/Appears in) (excerpted, in part, from Rare Antiquarian, or Just Plain Old: Cataloging Pre-Twentieth Century Cartographic Resources)

From

Many single-sheet maps were originally published as plates bound in another work, usually an atlas. If the original work from which the map was removed can be identified with a high degree of certainty, this information should be added to the bibliographic description. The cataloger must use extreme caution when making this determination, as a given map may have been published both as a single sheet and as a part of an atlas.

The term From is used when describing the source of the item only when the map is identical with a plate in an atlas of other work and there is physical evidence that the item was removed from another publication (e.g., a plate number, folds, backing, text on verso, map printed on two sheets joined, etc.). If there is any doubt as to whether a map has been detached from an atlas, use Appears in instead.

When constructing the 500 note, use the possessive form of the entry element when citing the work from which an item is removed, and include the full imprint information (if known) and date of publication (if known). One method to find this information is to search Orbis for the author/title of the original atlas (if located at Yale). If the main entry for the item from which it is removed is the same as the main entry for the map, use only the last name in the 500 note. If the main entry for the item from which it is removed differs from the main entry for the map, use the full form of the name in the 500 note.

Example (Map by Robert Dudley removed from Dudley's Dell'arcano del mare)

500     ‡a From Dudley's Dell'arcano del mare. In Firenze : Nella stamperia di Francesco Onofri, 1646-47.

Also make an added name/title entry for the cited title:

700 1   ‡a Dudley, Robert, ‡c Sir, ‡d 1574-1649. ‡t Dell'arcano del mare.

 

Example (Map by Hendrik Hondius; removed from Jan Jansson's Nieuwen atlas)

500     ‡a From Jan Jansson's Nieuwen atlas ... Amstelodami : Apud Ioannem Ianssonium, 1652.

Also make an added name/title entry for the cited title:

700 1   ‡a Jansson, Jan, ‡d 1588-1664. ‡t Atlas novus. ‡l Dutch.

 

Appears In

Use the term Appears in to describe an item that is identical with a plate in a specific atlas or other work, but which exhibits no physical evidence (e.g., a plate number, folds, backing, text on verso, map printed on two sheets joined, etc.) of having been removed from another work.

The phrase is also used to describe an item that is identical with a plate that appears in several different editions of an atlas or in several different works. This phrase is used even if there is physical evidence that the item has been removed since it is usually impossible to determine which of the different editions of works originally contained the item. Variance between the date of the item and the publication date of the atlas should not affect the decision of whether to add the note.

When constructing the 500 note, use the possessive form of the entry element when citing the work from which an item is removed, and include only the title of the publication. When an item is found in multiple editions of a work, always cite the earliest edition that contains the plate. If the main entry for the item from which it is removed is the same as the main entry for the map, use only the last name in the 500 note. If the main entry for the item from which it is removed differs from the main entry for the map, use the full form of the name in the 500 note.

Example (Map by Vaugondy appearing in Vaugondy's Atlas universal)

500     ‡a Appears in Vaugondy's Atlas universal.

Also make and added name/title entry for the cited title:

700 1   ‡a Robert de Vaugondy, Gilles, ‡d 1688-1766. ‡t Atlas universel.

Example (Map by Isaac Massa; appeared in Joan Blaeu's Atlas maior)

500     ‡a Appears in Joan Blaeu's Atlas maior.

Also make and added name/title entry for the cited title:

700 1   ‡a Blaeu, Joan, ‡d 1596-1673. ‡t Atlas maior.

 

7B15. Bibliographic references. Cite a list or bibliography when it would serve to distinguish an edition (or variant) from similar editions (or variants), when it would substantiate information provided by the cataloger, or when it would provide a more detailed description of the publication being cataloged.

See Cartographic Materials Bibliographies for those bibliographies most often cited.

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ACCESS POINTS

Name and Title Access Points (1xx, 246, 7xx)

 
All name and title access points required by the latest national standards are made. Generous name access points are made to bring out contributors such as editors, engravers, printers, cartographers, surveyors, publishers and issuing bodies.
 
Library of Congress Subject Headings (6xx)
 
For items receiving full-level cataloging, subject headings are assigned according to the latest edition of LC Subject Headings and the LC Subject Cataloging Manual. Catalogers should include the following:
651   0 ‡a [Geographic name] ‡v Maps.
For more information on using the subdivision, ‡v Maps, see Subject Cataloging Manual H1685 - Maps and Atlases.
 
If the cartographic material is a railroad map, add subject:
650   0 a Railroads ‡z [Geographic name] ‡v Maps.
For pre-1800 material, add subdivision ‡v Early works to 1800.
651   0 ‡a [Geographic name] ‡v Mapsv Early works to 1800.

 

 

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Local Tracings

In addition to all applicable standard LC subject headings, local tracings for provenance, chronology, binding and imprint are made when called for by local policies

Genre/Form Tracings

Always add the following narrow genre/form tracings, when appropriate. Use multiple tracings, when appropriate (e.g., an atlas of nautical charts). Subdivide geographically, not by place of publication, but by place described, and then by date. Use the broadest geographical subdivision possible; e.g., for an atlas of the Pacific Northwest, do not make separate 655s for Washington, Oregon, Idaho, etc., but rather use: Northwest, Pacific. All headings are followed at end by ‡2 local.

Example:

655   7 ‡a Cadastral maps ‡z Texas ‡z Harris County ‡y 1902. ‡2 local

For select definitions of the following genre/form tracings, search the appropriate term at the Library of Congress Subject Headings site.

Aerial photographs
Aerial views
Aeronautical charts
Astronomical models
Bathymetric maps
Bottle-charts
Cadastral maps (use in place of "Plat maps")
Celestial charts
Children's maps
Comparative maps
Digital maps
Fire insurance maps
Geological cross-sections
Globes
Loran charts
Manuscript maps
Mappae mundi (used for early medieval world maps)
Meteorological charts
Military maps (a map designed particularly for military use)
Mine maps
Miniature maps
Nautical charts
Outline maps
Physical maps
Pictorial maps
Plotting charts
Portolan charts
Quadrangle maps
Relief maps
Road maps
Statistical maps
Stick charts
Strip maps
Thematic maps
Topographic maps
Tourist maps
Wall maps
World maps
Worm's-eye views

When it is not possible to add a narrower genre/form tracing for specific material, add the following broader genre/form tracing, subdivided geographically, not by place of publication, but by place described, and then by date.

Maps

Example:

655   7 ‡a Maps ‡z France ‡z Paris ‡y 1678. ‡2 local

For a map which shows California as an island, use the following tracing; do not subdivide geographically, but by date.

655   7 ‡a California as an island ‡y [date]. ‡2 local

Certain form and genre terms are always added when called for by local practice. Other applicable standard form and genre terms may be added on a case by case basis when this does not slow down cataloging productivity and are generally retained if present in copy.

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Example

(Click on the link below to view full Orbis record)

A map of South America ... London : Printed for Robert Sayer, July the 1st, 1787.

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