Yale University Library

 

OHAM: Mason Martens on Hindemith

OHAM Info

 

Mason Martens

with Caitriona Bolster

815 Second Avenue

New York, New York

June 4, 1975

 

 

Table of Contents

 

side a                                                                                                                          (pp. 1-23)

Martens’ studies with Hindemith during 1952-53-- his student, Joe Iadone-- Martens’ ideas about the study of music history-- categorization of music students at Yale-- description of his courses-- his grading system-- history of theory course-- course switch that involved his two—part writing book-- choice of subject matter-- interest in Helmholz and Jeans-- as an interesting and original teacher-- his fascination with pure learning-- versatility with many instruments-- Al Loeffler as a possible reference-- interest in Schlick’s treatise of 1911 and the problem of tuning organs-- his charts of intonation-- his homemade notebooks-- interest in Greek music theory-- Curt Sach’s book, Rhythm and Tempo-- his attempt to simplify Greek theory-- interest in the kithara-- Dick Crocker's reconstruction of an early instrument-- Martens’ term paper on the Cyclos Song from Asia Minor-- transcribing the Cyclos song-- the emphasis of his history of theory course-- reading aloud in class instead of using mimeographs-- the Three—Part Writing Book-- lecture format-- ideas about musical rhythm-- his expect­ations of his students-- assigning term projects-- grading-- the “nutty” projects in his class-- participation in class.

side b                                                                                                                         (pp. 23-45)

His English-- similarity of the two theory courses-- vast amounts of material presented in his classes-- respect for Strunk-- his work in Turkey-- his remark about Turkish military bands-- interest in ethnomusicology-- interest in Hornbostel’s work-- project on overtones-- his unique imagination-- his practical approach-- respect for Joseph Yasser-- plainsong reading group-- friendship with Dom Gajard-- Boatwright’s course using the traditional harmony book-- Martens’ educational background--  melody training-- evolutionary production of the Three—Part Writing Book-- students, Easley Blackwood and Elliot Kaplan-- The Craft of Musical Composition Part I--  as a scholar and theoretician-- as a teacher-- his attitude towards the study of music-- the liberal arts curriculum in medieval universities-- the unique music instruction at Yale-- interest in Galileo Galilei-- his family background.

HINDEMITH PROJECT                              30/33

 

Mason Martens

with Caitriona Bolster

815 Second Avenue

New York, New York

June 4, 1975

 

Yale University

New Haven, CT

July 29, 1975

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Side c                                                                                                                  (pp. 52-71)

The “aristocracy of learning”--compared with Elgar--Hindemith as inspirer of people to learn--Joe Iadone--mystical bond between Hindemith students--music in higher education, especially at Yale in the ‘40’s and now--Hindemith as a model of serious musical scholarship--Episcopal church--Leo Schrade--the mystical bond from a practical standpoint--Robert Hickok--choral music research and scholarship--Gabrieli and Sacre Symphonies--Hindemith as a choral conductor--’53 Collegium concert--Monteverdi Sestina--problem of elision in setting Italian--Malipiero--Schrade reediting Monteverdi Vespers

 

Side d                                                                                                                 (pp. 72-93)

 

Hindemith’s kindness and bluntness--bringing out a student’s best doing away “party” for Hindemith--Sonata for Four Horns--Symphony Harmonie Mundi [Die Harmonie der Welt]--Cantique de l’Esperance (“Claudel Cantata”)--UNESCO--witnessing Hindemith’s will--his mode of dress--Marten’s choir experience--Renaissance settings of Mass ordinary--’51 Collegium concert--make-up of the Collegium--Commemoratio Brevis [newsletter]--Beekman Cannon’s Baroque course--integrating history and theory with performance--Charlotte Durkee--music preparation for the Collegium--editing--Elliot Kaplan--Hindemith’s end-of-the-term statement in the newsletter--two mistakes in program notes

 

Mason Martens

with Caitriona Bolster

815 Second Avenue

New York, New York

June 4, 1975

and Yale University

New Haven, CT

July 29, 1975

 

 

Table of Contents

 

Side e                                                                                                                          (pp.1-16)

Mayor Reuter of Berlin-- structure of Yale School of Music: faculty and major programs-- Howard Boatwright-- printing Collegium programs-- more on Charlotte Durkee-- Hindemith and Durkee as copyists-- Hindemith’s non-musical New Haven connections-- his interest in printing-- preserving multilith program masters-- ephemera-- Madrigal concert, Town Hall, NY-- Cello Concerto with NY Philharmonic; Parisot, soloist, Hindemith conducting-- Hindemith’s handmade score for Cherubini, Overture to Médée--  Organ Concerto performance, Anton Heiller, soloist, 1963-- When Lilacs Last in the Door-Yard Bloom’d: Requiem for Those We Love, Schola Cantorum

Side f                                                                                                                          (pp.16-35)

Martens’ first hearing of Requiem-- Hugh Ross-- orchestra and chorus rehearsal time-- The Great Maestro Syndrome-- concerto playing-- New Haven Symphony-- Martens’ opinion of the Requiem-- Lincoln Center-- Organ Concerto-- Peter Ustinov-- Walton’s Belshazzar’s Feast-- Hindemith’s Mass, American premiere-- premieres and copyrights-- Wiener Kammercorps-- Jim Palsgrove-- putting together the NY premiere of the Mass-- Woolsey Hall and its acoustics-- doubling chorus with instruments-- Bruckner’s E-minor Mass-- Hindemith’s second, unfinished Mass-- publication of Hindemith’s Complete Works-- errors in the Organ Sonatas-- Frank Bozyan-- Robert Noehren-- Hindemith’s music in posterity-- Edward Gold-- Sonata for Four Horns, Ludus Tonalis, Second Organ Sonata, Trauermusik, Konzert-- Mathis der Maler-- Hamburg Opera performing Mathis at the Met-- little, quirky pieces and marginalia-- the Revisionist Problem-- Das Marienleben-- W.H. Auden-- Britten’s On This Island-- the rise and fall of reputations-- Hindemith’s wordplay-- planning choral programs-- Hindemith’s practicality and teaching ability-- a comparison with Leo Schrade