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Cyrillic language alphabets and how they diverge from one another

The following letters in the Cyrillic alphabet diverge from those in Russian, as found in the Library of Congress Russian transliteration table. This chart includes letters from Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian, Russian (cursive), and Ukranian that are unique to that language. The chart serves to help identify the language of publications in the Cyrillic alphabet.

This information was compiled from: Cyrillic Alphabets by Karel Piska, transliteration tables from the Princeton University Slavic Cataloging Manual, and A manual of European languages for librarians, by C.G. Allen.

Bulgarian

Upper case Lower case Transliterates as
Sht, sht
,

Macedonian

Upper case Lower case Transliterates as
,
Note: Macedonian uses the Serbian form of the Cyrillic alphabet, but uses:
° and after and T instead of and
° s (dz) after
Upper case Lower case Transliterates as
,
S s Dz, dz
J j J, j
,
Lj, lj
Nj, n j
C, c [transliterates as , in Russian]
,

Serbian

Upper case Lower case Transliterates as
,
J j J, j
Lj, lj
Nj, n j
,

Russian (cursive)

Upper case Lower case Transliterates as
Ë ë Ë, ë

Ukranian

H, h [transliterates as G, g in Russian]
G, g
,
, [transliterates Zh, zh in Russian]
Y, y [transliterates as I, i in Russian]
I i I, i [transliterates as , in Russian]
Ï ï Ï, ï


[Return to Music Cataloging at Yale]Comments to Mickey Koth, Yale University Music Library
©Yale University Library Last revised June 14, 2013.