Babylonian Collection, Sterling Memorial Library



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Nebuchadnezzar and the Conquest of Jerusalem
Cylinder, 6th Century B.C.E.

Nebuchadnezzar II (604-562 B.C.E.) defeated the Egyptians, rebuilt Babylon, and renewed the glories of an independent Babylonia for the last time. He twice invaded Judaea, capturing Jerusalem, destroying its temple, and exiling the cream of its population to Babylon. But like the other members of his dynasty (variously known as the Chaldaean Dynasty or the Tenth Dynasty of Babylon), he forbore to rehearse the details of his victorious campaigns in his own inscriptions, which dwell by preference on his pious activities on behalf of the Babylonian deities. This cylinder, for example, commemorates his reconstruction of the temple of the god of the city Marada. For his campaigns against Jerusalem, we must turn instead to the "Babylonian Chronicle," a priestly record of the chief events of each year beginning in 747 B.C. The Chronicle's version of matters is remarkably similar to that preserved in the Bible (2 Kings 24:10-17 etc.).
Literature: W.W. Hallo, "Nebukadnezar Comes to Jerusalem," in Jonathan V. Plaut, ed., Through the Sound of Many Voices: Writing Contribute on the Occasion of the 70th Birthday of W. Gunther Plaut (Toronto, Lester and Orpen Dennys, 1882) 40-57.
Place of publication: unpubl.
Museum number: NCBT 2314.






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Yale University Library
Nanette Stahl, Judaica Curator
and Judy A. Schiff, Chief Research Archivist,
Manuscripts and Archives, Sterling Memorial Library
All contents copyright (C) 1995
Yale University Library
All rights reserved
URL: http://www.library.yale.edu/exhibition/judaica/