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Facsimile of a page from Maimonides' great philosophical work Moreh Nevukhim (Guide of the Perplexed) written originally in Arabic and here in the Hebrew translation of Samuel ibn Tibbon (ca. 1160-1230) copied and illuminated in Barcelona, 1348. The seated figure is holding an astrolabe.

Royal Library, Copenhagen, Cod. Hebr. XXXVII, fol. 114r [Ex. No. 70]

Judaica Collection, Sterling Memorial Library





Facsimile of the colophon of the Lisbon Mishneh Torah written by the scribe Solomon ibn Alzuk and completed in 1471-72.

The British Library, London, Harley Ms. 5699, fol. 434v [Ex. No. 68]

Judaica Collection, Sterling Memorial Library






Facsimile of a page with a decorated title-panel of Sefer ha-Mada (Book of Knowledge) from the first book of the Mishneh Torah, Germany, 1295-96. The illustrations are not related to the text; notice the two knights in combat at the bottom.

Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Ms. Kaufmann A77/I, 16v, [Ex. No. 67]

Judaica Collection, Sterling Memorial Library






Facsimile of a page with a decorated title-panel of Sefer Mishpatim (Book of Civil Law) from the 13th book of the Mishneh Torah, northern Italy, 15th century. In the bottom register three men stand before a panel of four seated judges. The top register consists of a jousting scene that is unrelated to the text.

Private collection, fol. 298v. [Ex. No. 69]

Judaica Collection, Sterling Memorial Library






Facsimile of a page with a decorated title-panel of Sefer Ahavah (Book of Love) from the second book of the Mishneh Torah. Spain and Italy, 14th century.
This is one of the most elaborately decorated manuscripts of the Mishneh Torah. In the absence of a colophon, it can be inferred from the script that the manuscript was copied either in Spain or southern France in the first half of the 14th century (in any case, before 1351, when the codex was sold in Avignon). The scribe's name was probably Isaac, since this name is decorated in several places in the text. The manuscript was illuminated in burnished gold and lively wash colors by a skilled non-Jewish artist of Perugia by the name of Matteo di Ser Cambio.

Jewish National and University Library, Jerusalem, Heb. 4* 1103

Judaica Collection, Sterling Memorial Library









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