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October 2012 Archives

October 1, 2012

Collaboration in the Classroom

Location: CSSSI Statlab
Date: Friday, October 5
Time: Lunch at 11:30am. Fair begins at 12:00pm.
Presenter: Casey Watts, Assistant Manager ITS Student Technology Collaborative and recent Yale graduate

Lectures, seminars, and lab classes can all benefit from collaborative learning given the right technology. That technology has arrived! This hands-on event will cover the use of many free technologies available for use in classes, including CrocoDoc, Google Drive (and Google Groups), and Slidee.

For more information on this and forthcoming Lux Talks: http://luxtalks.commons.yale.edu/

October 5, 2012

The Tale of the Japanese folding screens

The tale of the Japanese folding screens: A journey from Japan to Yale

As students and faculty return to campus for the fall term, a set of historical materials from Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library will also be making their homecoming: Harimaze Byōbu, a set of hand-written documents originally housed on two folding screens that span the history of Japan between the 12th and 18th centuries.

On Friday, Oct. 5, Yale will hold a ceremony to commemorate the return of the Harimaze Byōbu documents. Titled “The tale of the Japanese folding screens: A journey from Japan to Yale (and back),” the event will take place at 3 p.m. at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall St, to be followed by a reception. The event is sponsored by the Yale University Library and is free and open to the public.

The full story and slideshow are posted on YaleNews: http://news.yale.edu/2012/09/27/homecoming-harimaze-bu-documents-exemplifies-yale-s-historical-ties-japan

A slideshow illustrating the conservation process is also available is at: http://news.yale.edu/photos/homecoming-harimaze-bu-documents-exemplifies-yale-s-historical-ties-japan

October 8, 2012

Photogrammar Project & Depression-Era Photo Archives

Wednesday October 10, 3:00 pm
Sterling Memorial Library International Room

From 1935 to 1945, during the Great Depression and World War II, the Federal government, under the Farm Securities Administration and Office of War Information, commissioned over 170,000 photographs of the nation. Due to the large number of these photographs, scholarly research into the FSA-OWI collection has relied primarily on the photographers' correspondence and anecdotal evidence garnered from relatively few images. Other sciences and social sciences, however, frequently manage to make qualitative and quantitative inferences from large data sets. How can we use similar methods and technology to study large media collections in the humanities? Additionally, how can such a large collection be made available and accessible to the general public? In this panel, we show how visual data can be revisualized and reimagined by putting into a single conversation current issues in the digital humanities, visual culture studies, empirical social sciences, and statistical computing. We will display the prototype of a website, titled photogrammar, dedicated to reimagining the FSA-OWI photograph collection, which currently exists as a simple repository on the Library of Congress' website. By seeing these photographs as points on interactive geospatial maps, users are able to transform current paradigms of the collection as a simple archive of images into a dynamic tool, viewable in an array of spatial, temporal, and topical dimensions.

The panel will feature the members of the Photogrammar Project interdisciplinary team which includes Professor Laura Wexler (American Studies and Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies), map guru Stacey Maples (Map Collection), technologist Ken Panko (Instructional Technology) and graduate students Lauren Tilton (American Studies) and Taylor Arnold (Statistics). All are welcome.

About SCOPA
Yale University Library's Standing Committee on Professional Awareness, SCOPA, strives to encourage professional growth and the development of librarianship as a dynamic profession. SCOPA organizes a regular series of forums devoted to a wide range of topics concerning initiatives in Yale libraries and academic libraries in general. SCOPA welcomes suggestions concerning possible future forums.

SCOPA Grants Forum

Thursday October 18, 2:00 pm
Sterling Memorial Library Lecture Hall

Yale's Grant & Contract Office managers Laura Kozma, Cheryl Magoveny, and Melanie Smith will present an overview of the grant process. Topics to be covered include identifying sponsored funding sources and grant proposal submission process and procedures. The presentation will be followed by a question and answer session. All are welcome.

About SCOPA
Yale University Library's Standing Committee on Professional Awareness, SCOPA, strives to encourage professional growth and the development of librarianship as a dynamic profession. SCOPA organizes a regular series of forums devoted to a wide range of topics concerning initiatives in Yale libraries and academic libraries in general. SCOPA welcomes suggestions concerning possible future forums.

Fall Issue of Nota Bene now available online

The latest issue of Nota Bene: News from the Yale Library, is now available online at: http://www.library.yale.edu/notabene/

Nota Bene is published during the academic year to acquaint the Yale community and others interested in the resources of the Yale libraries. Each issue features articles on new collections and acquisitions, public programs, services to students and scholars, and special events. Nota Bene transitioned to an electronic publication in Spring 2010.

October 9, 2012

10/18 @ 4pm The Effect of Language on Economic Behavior

"The Effect of Language on Economic Behavior: Evidence from Savings Rates, Health Behaviors, and Retirement Assets"

Thursday, October 18, 2012 4:00 PM
Kline Biology Tower (KBT), CSSSI, Study Room South
219 Prospect St., New Haven

One of the oldest and most controversial topics in linguistics and related cognitive sciences is whether the language you speak can influence the way you think. I take a new look this question by testing a linguistic-savings hypothesis: that languages which disassociate the future from the present lead their speakers to take fewer future-oriented actions, like saving for retirement, exercising, or practicing safe sex. I test this by looking at speakers of over 140 languages in large economic data sets from all over the world. What I find is that speakers whose languages grammatically disassociate the future and the present save less, hold less retirement wealth, smoke more, are more likely to be obese, and engage in riskier sexual behaviors. This is true in every major region of the world and holds even when comparing only demographically similar individuals born and living in the same country.

Keith Chen is an Associate Professor of Economics at the Yale School of Management whose research intersects economics, psychology, and biology. His recent work explores how people's economic choices are influenced by their language and its structure, specifically how future tense construction appears to influence future-oriented behaviors as diverse as savings and smoking.
Light refreshments will be served.

For more information: http://csssi.yale.edu/

October 16, 2012

Director of Schomburg Center to Speak at Yale Library

Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Director, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Monday October 29, 1:00 pm
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Room 38/39

In this forum Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, director of The New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, will discuss his work. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in economics, and received his doctorate in American history from Rutgers University. Dr. Muhammad was formerly a history professor at Indiana University. His book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, Harvard University Press, 2010, won the John Hope Franklin Publication Prize for 2011. Dr. Muhammad has participated in a PBS documentary, "Slavery by Another Name," based on Douglas Blackmon's book of the same name, and has appeared with Tavis Smiley and Bill Moyers.

This event is co-sponsored by the Beinecke Library and the Department of African American Studies' Endeavors Colloquium Series. Visit: African American Studies at the Beinecke Library at: http://beineckejwj.library.yale.edu/. This event is free and open to the public.

October 17, 2012

TEAL Classroom - Lux Talk on 10/19

TEAL Classroom
CSSSI StatLab
Friday, October 19th, 2012
12PM-1PM (Lunch served 11:30AM-12PM)

TEAL (Technology-Enhanced Active Learning) is a new way of teaching pioneered at MIT that combines lecture, recitation, and hands-on laboratory experiments into a specially designed classroom. This Lux Talk focuses on Yale's TEAL classroom project and the technology and philosophy behind its design.

All welcome!

Fortunoff Archives keeping the past alive 30 years later

The Fortunoff Archive at Yale, which has collected the personal stories of thousands of survivors and first-hand witnesses of the Holocaust, is marking its 30th year with an exhibition at Sterling Memorial Library on view through Nov. 6 and a conference titled “The Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies: Achievements and Challenges, 1982–2012” on Oct. 21.

Founded in 1982, the Fortunoff Archive is dedicated to the recording, collection, and preservation of videotaped oral testimonies of Holocaust survivors and witnesses. Read more of this YaleNews article at: http://news.yale.edu/2012/10/16/thirty-years-later-fortunoff-archives-still-keeping-alive-past-future#.UH70BzlE_oI.facebook

October 31, 2012

CANCELLED! New Directions for Digital Scholarship

DUE TO ONGOING TRAVEL DISRUPTION CAUSED BY HURRICANE SANDY AND THE CLEAN UP OPERATION, THIS EVENT HAS BEEN SUSPENDED AND WILL BE RESCHEDULED FOR THE SPRING. THANK YOU FOR YOUR UNDERSTANDING.

Friday November 2, 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Levinson Auditorium, Yale Law School

In the humanities and in the social sciences, technology is radically transforming scholarly practice. In light of these developments, scholars are posing new questions as technology continues to alter the horizons of research, knowledge dissemination, public engagement and teaching in unanticipated and sometimes disruptive ways. This forum will examine how scholarship and its supporting institutions might face the upcoming challenges and opportunities of an open, digital and networked environment.

On November 2, 2012, under the aegis of the Yale University Library, three world leaders in digital scholarship will explore the implications of computing and communications technology for the humanities and the social sciences. Together with members of the university community, they will inaugurate a conversation (to be continued in the spring) on the new directions for digital scholarship and the transformative, dynamic and innovative role Yale might assume in this rapidly changing scholarly landscape. Yale University Librarian Susan Gibbons will introduce the forum and a number of innovative digital scholarship projects from across the university will be featured.

Keynote Speakers include: Tom Cramer, Associate Director of Digital Library Systems and Services, Stanford University; Ray Siemens, Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing, University of Victoria; Claire Warwick, Professor of Digital Humanities, University College London.

Respondents include: Michael Dula, Chief Technology Officer, Yale University Library; Ken Panko, Manager of Digital Humanities and Instructional Technology, Yale University; Laura Wexler, Professor of American Studies & Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies, Yale University.

The forum is free and open to the public. For more information and to register: http://digitalscholarship.commons.yale.edu/

NEW DATE! Digitization and Digital Libraries in France 11/1

RESCHEDULED to Thursday Nov 1, 10am
SML International Room

Many of France's ancient and valuable collections are excellent candidates for digitization. Yet the different library settings in which these collections are housed makes it difficult to lead a comprehensive approach to digital initiatives. In this forum Bernadette Vincent will discuss the challenges involved in creating a holistic strategy for digitizing collections in France, the major achievements to date, and ideas for tackling future projects.

Bernadette Vincent is a librarian from the Bibliothèque universitaire des langues et civilisations (BULAC) in Paris. She is visiting the Yale Library on a Fulbright grant in order to investigate best practices related to the digitization of non-Roman manuscripts. All are welcome to attend the talk.

About SCOPA
Yale University Library's Standing Committee on Professional Awareness, SCOPA, strives to encourage professional growth and the development of librarianship as a dynamic profession. SCOPA organizes a regular series of forums devoted to a wide range of topics concerning initiatives in Yale libraries and academic libraries in general. SCOPA welcomes suggestions concerning possible future forums.