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April 16, 2013

A Brief History of News (at Yale)

April 29 – July 5, 2013
Sterling Memorial Library Exhibits Corridor
Curated by Tyler James Griffith, MA '11 (Public Humanities), MPhil '12, PhD Candidate, History/History of Science and Medicine

Like Elihu Yale himself, Yale College was born amidst an historical "news boom" during the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Yale's culture of student journalism is one of the oldest and most long-standing in North America. Moreover, Yale's Library system has an abundant collection of historic newspapers from all time periods: spread over its many collections are examples spanning more than four centuries and five distinct types of media. The library also tells a physical history of news, because Newspaper and Periodical Rooms have been a part of Yale as far back as its first purpose-built library structure. This exhibition investigates different facets of news history through the use of newspapers available in Yale’s Library system. It begins with the earliest examples of English-language newspapers in the seventeenth century, moves through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and concludes with an exploration of how the physical space of news-reading and news-production has evolved at Yale over time.

May 1, 2012

[Your Name Here]: The Ex-Libris and Image Making


April 30 to August 17
The Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library
180 York Street

Also known as ex-libris, bookplates are labels pasted inside the front covers of books to indicate ownership. This exhibition explores the ex-libris through the theme of image making. Despite its small format, the bookplate is an inventive art form that inspires artists working in an encyclopedic array of graphic media. The bookplate functions as a mark of possession; however, this simple purpose belies how fervently book owners and artists consider the bookplate a vehicle for self-expression. [Your Name Here] examines both historic and modern examples of bookplates with a variety of motifs. It also uncovers how questions of authorship arise in the collaboration between artist and patron as well as in the act of collecting itself.

With an estimated one million individual bookplate specimens, dating from the fifteenth to the twentieth century, the Yale Bookplate Collection is one of the largest such collections in the world. However, this collection is not a singular entity; rather, its holdings comprise many different collections and an assortment of documentary materials. It is a unique visual archive that forms a timeline of the history and the art of the ex-libris. Moreover, the collection serves as a significant resource for the study of bookplates as well as that of biography and histories of the book, art and design, and collecting. In addition to bookplates, the selections on view include process materials, original sketches, correspondence, publications, and other related printed ephemera.

The exhibit is curated by Molly Dotson, Bookplate Project Archivist in the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library. For more information, contact her at molly.dotson@yale.edu or at (203) 432-7074.

The exhibit will be on view until August 17. It is free and open to the public. A current Yale ID (with a prox chip) is required to enter the Haas Family Arts Library during all regular business hours. Non-Yale visitors are also welcome and can gain access to the Library through the security guard in the Loria Center entrance hall.

February 1, 2012

Remembering Shakespeare: Beinecke exhibit and opening reception

Remembering Shakespeare
Wednesday, February 1 - Monday, June 4, 2012

Remembering Shakespeare tells the story of how a playwright and poet in late sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century England came to be remembered as the world's most venerated author. Curated by David Scott Kastan, George M. Bodman Professor of English at Yale, and Kathryn James, Beinecke Library Curator, the exhibition brings together works from the holdings of Yale University's Elizabethan Club, Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale Center for British Art, and Beinecke Library, in an unprecedented display of one of North America's finest collections on Shakespeare. Drawing on these extraordinary resources, Remembering Shakespeare offers a unique visual history of how the "Booke" of Shakespeare was made and read, written and remembered, from his lifetime through the present.

An opening lecture and reception will take place on Wednesday February 15th, 4:30pm on the mezzanine level of the Beinecke. The lecture, "Remembering the Corpus: The Complete Works of Shakespeare", will be given by David Kastan, the Yale University George M. Bodman Professor of English

The exhibit and opening are free and open to the public. For opening times, please go to the Beinecke's website at: http://library.yale.edu/beinecke/
A web exhibition of Remembering Shakespeare and other exhibitions from the Shakespeare at Yale program of exhibitions and events in Spring 2012.

October 28, 2011

New Library Exhibit: Making Sense of Religion

Making Sense of Religion
October 3, 2011 – February 4, 2012

Sterling Memorial Library, Memorabilia Room
Presented in partnership with the Initiative for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion in collaboration with Yale Manuscripts and Archives, this exhibit features material from the
Yale Divinity School Archives, Yale Manuscripts and Archives, the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, and the Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical History Library.

The exhibit is free and open to the public.

December 14, 2010

New Exhibit at the Lewis Walpole Library

Illustrious Heads: Portrait Prints as History
22 November 2010 – 29 July 2011

Engraved “heads,” or portrait prints, in close alliance with literary history and biography, carried substantial power as expressions of political and social preoccupations in eighteenth-century England. Published for both book illustration and independent issue, with and without text, portrait prints recorded and articulated a national past that was conceived as the “portraiture” of illustrious historical persons—a visual and literary representation of a sequence of notable individuals—rather than as a narrative representation of a series of significant political, diplomatic, or military events. Additionally, straight portraits—and increasingly caricatures—of contemporary persons played a vital role in negotiating topical political and social issues and documenting the surrounding discourse for posterity. The prints selected for this exhibition suggest the variety of portrait and caricature publications and present some of the diverse ways in which they were considered as repositories of history, biography, and anecdote. The exhibition also explores the engagement of eighteenth-century audiences with questions of sitter classification, authenticity, provenance, and scarcity.


The exhibition is free and open to the public during gallery hours: Wednesdays, 2 - 4:30 p.m. The exhibition may also be viewed during tours of the Library by appointment. Please call 860-677-2140 for more information.

November 30, 2010

Yale Arts Library Exhibition Extended By Popular Demand

Yale University’s Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, 180 York Street, will extend the exhibition “Material Meets Metaphor: A Half Century of Book Art by Richard Minsky” through December 21, 2010.

Continue reading "Yale Arts Library Exhibition Extended By Popular Demand" »

Exhibition Features Rare Chinese Books

A new exhibit in the East Asian Reading Room (SML 222) highlights Chinese Rare Books in the Yale Collections.

It features some of the highlights of Chinese works in East Asia Library Special Collections and will be on display though the winter.

In addition, we will display a recent chance discovery, one volume of an edition of the Five Classics that entered the Yale College Library in 1849. While not a “rare” book, this volume is one of a group that were purchased for the Library in 1849, well before what has been considered the beginning of the Chinese Collection at Yale (the 1878 donation of Yung Wing’s personal collection).

Samuel Wells Williams, future Yale professor, was involved in organizing this shipment for Yale during the time he resided in the treaty port of Canton. This find allows us to document a much earlier start for the collecting of East Asian books at Yale and in North America in general and is therefore quite an exciting find!

eal-rare.jpg

October 27, 2010

New Exhibit at the Law Library

The Lillian Goldman Law Library has mounted a new exhibit by Margaret Chisholm, Public Services Librarian: “The 50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1960 (1960-2010)/ Congress Advances Voting Rights in an Era Marked by Bold Citizen Activism.” The poster below advertising the exhibit has a smart phone code on the bottom right corner. The code pulls up the official MORRIS catalog list of items on reserve for the exhibit, including two feature films; a PBS documentary; Eyes on the Prize; biographies; memoirs; one oral history; and collected writings, among other things.

The Exhibit will be on view until January 2011. All are welcome.

October 21, 2010

Music Library Exhibit/Reception 10/28 4pm-6pm

*Please join us for an opening reception in the Music Library* Thursday October 28th, 4-6pm

Encountering the Other in the Music Library’s Special Collections on display through January 13th, 2011

The Gilmore Music Library’s vast Special Collections are renowned for their strong emphasis on Western music. Embedded within the collections, however, are historical encounters with music outside of the Western classical canon.

In this exhibit, the music of “the Other” comes to us from a variety of sources: early voyages of discovery, the impetus to incorporate ethnic and indigenous traditions into art music, and the portrayal of racial identity in American music.

Visit the exhibit website: www.encounteringtheother.wordpress.com

September 8, 2010

Superheroes in Court! Lawyers, Law and Comic Books

September - December 2010
Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Level L2, Lillian Goldman Law Library
Yale Law School
127 Wall Street, New Haven CT

Lawyers have played both fictional and real-life roles in the 80-year history of the comic book industry. Their story is told in an exhibition, "Superheroes in Court! Lawyers, Law and Comic Books," now on display in the Yale Law School's Lillian Goldman Law Library.

The guest curator for the exhibition is Mark S. Zaid, Esq., a Washington, D.C. attorney who specializes in national security law. Much like his comic-book heroes, Zaid has an alter-ego as a comic book collector and dealer. He is also an advisor to the Overstreet Comic Book Price & Grading Guides and a co-founder of the Comic Book Collecting Association (www.comiccollecting.org).

Almost all of the items on display come from Zaid's personal collection. The comics covers show Superman on trial for murder, and one of the earliest comic books to feature a lawyer on the cover ("Mr. District Attorney", 1942). Other items document the legal battle over rights to Superman, efforts to censor comic books in the 1950s, and copyright issues.

The exhibition will be on display through Dec. 16, 2010, in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, located on Level L2 of the Lillian Goldman Law Library in the Yale Law School (127 Wall St., New Haven CT). The exhibition is open to the public. Highlights of the exhibition will appear on the Yale Law Library Rare Books Blog, at .

In addition, Mark Zaid will give an exhibition talk on Sept. 30 at 1:00pm in the Yale Law School.

For more information, call Mike Widener, Rare Book Librarian, at (203) 432-4494 or email to mike.widener@yale.edu.

August 31, 2010

Scrolls to Cell Phones and Beyond – new exhibit

Scrolls to Cell Phones and Beyond: Publishing Technology and the Experience of the Written Text in Japan

DATES: September 6th, 2010 – December 10th, 2010
LOCATION: Sterling Memorial Library Corridor Exhibit Space (1st floor)

In many cultures throughout the centuries, publishing technology was used to produce texts. As publishing technologies and the medium of texts changed, production and distribution of texts also changed, impacting readership and the ways readers interacted with those texts. These technologies sometimes overlapped chronologically and were not mutually exclusive. For example, although Japanese woodblock scrolls are one of the earliest recorded uses of woodblock printing technology in the world, the practice of hand-copying manuscripts continued to be highly valued and printing technology did not become widespread until the Edo period. Like other countries, it is evident that Japanese readership throughout history has been influenced greatly by not only the manual copying of manuscripts on scrolls as a unique practice, but also the invention of typeset and woodblock printing techniques which promoted the standardization of texts. Physical features of books, such as formats, sizes, covers, and typography, contributed to the unique character of each literary artifact, suggesting the variety in readership. While industrial printing technologies increased readership, as well as promoted serialized stories in the field of literature, they also contributed to the uniqueness and character of reading objects. In recent years, new methods of textual creation, facilitated by the development of multimedia platforms for both creation and reception, such as the cellular phone, have brought an interactive dimension to readership.
This exhibit showcases the evolution of Japanese publishing technology and the experience of the written text. It is organized in conjunction with the annual conference for the Association of Japanese Literary Studies (AJLS) at Yale University, October 15-17, 2010, the theme of which is “technology”. Exhibited here are items ranging from valuable rare books to multimedia phenomena, all collected by the East Asia Library and other libraries at Yale University.

For more information about the East Asia Library at Yale, please go to: http://www.library.yale.edu/eastasian/ or contact the Curator of the exhibit at: east.asia.library@yale.edu or at (203) 432-1790.

August 18, 2010

Scrolls to Cell Phones and Beyond – new exhibit

Scrolls to Cell Phones and Beyond: Publishing Technology and the Experience of the Written Text in Japan

DATES: September 6th, 2010 – December 10th, 2010
LOCATION: Sterling Memorial Library Corridor Exhibit Space (1st floor)

In many cultures throughout the centuries, publishing technology was used to produce texts. As publishing technologies and the medium of texts changed, production and distribution of texts also changed, impacting readership and the ways readers interacted with those texts. These technologies sometimes overlapped chronologically and were not mutually exclusive. For example, although Japanese woodblock scrolls are one of the earliest recorded uses of woodblock printing technology in the world, the practice of hand-copying manuscripts continued to be highly valued and printing technology did not become widespread until the Edo period. Like other countries, it is evident that Japanese readership throughout history has been influenced greatly by not only the manual copying of manuscripts on scrolls as a unique practice, but also the invention of typeset and woodblock printing techniques which promoted the standardization of texts. Physical features of books, such as formats, sizes, covers, and typography, contributed to the unique character of each literary artifact, suggesting the variety in readership. While industrial printing technologies increased readership, as well as promoted serialized stories in the field of literature, they also contributed to the uniqueness and character of reading objects. In recent years, new methods of textual creation, facilitated by the development of multimedia platforms for both creation and reception, such as the cellular phone, have brought an interactive dimension to readership.
This exhibit showcases the evolution of Japanese publishing technology and the experience of the written text. It is organized in conjunction with the annual conference for the Association of Japanese Literary Studies (AJLS) at Yale University, October 15-17, 2010, the theme of which is “technology”. Exhibited here are items ranging from valuable rare books to multimedia phenomena, all collected by the East Asia Library and other libraries at Yale University.

For more information about the East Asia Library at Yale, please go to: http://www.library.yale.edu/eastasian/ or contact the Curator of the exhibit at: east.asia.library@yale.edu or at (203) 432-1790.

August 2, 2010

Yale Arts Library Presents Exhibition of Works by Renowned Book Artist Richard Minsky

New Haven, Conn.— Yale University’s Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, 180 York Street, will host the exhibition “Material Meets Metaphor: A Half Century of Book Art by Richard Minsky” from August 2 through November 29.

The exhibition covers 50 years of Minsky’s work — from a 1960 sample book, used when he started his first letterpress printing business at age 13, to “Self-Portrait 2010,” a book that documents the evolution of a canvas, from pencil sketch through many layers of oil paint.

Yale University Library acquired the Richard Minsky Archive in 2004. It includes maquettes, molds for castings, and correspondence, as well as holographic manuscripts and early versions of select works. It documents Minsky's exploration of printing technologies from the mimeograph and spirit duplicator to his early use of inkjet printing on handmade paper.

“Minsky’s work as an artist and as founder of The Center for Book Arts in New York changed the way people see and make books,” said Jae Jennifer Rossman, the Haas Family Arts Library’s Assistant Director for Special Collections.

Many of Minsky's editioned works (non-commissioned work made in multiple copies) will be on view in the exhibition, along with unique works that have become iconic in the field of book art. These include his 1975 binding of “The Birds of North America” and “The Crisis of Democracy,” bound in sheepskin, gold and barbed wire.

More information about Minsky and his work is available online at www.minsky.com. His new book, “The Art of American Book Covers, 1875–1930,” was published this year by George Braziller, Inc.

The Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library opened in August 2008 in the renovated Paul Rudolph Hall and the new Loria Center for the History of Art. The library brings together the collections, staff, and resources from the former Art + Architecture and Drama libraries and the Arts of the Book Collection, as well as staff and services for the Visual Resources Collection. It serves as the library for the Schools of Art, Architecture, and Drama, as well as the Department of the History of Art and the Yale University Art Gallery. The library is open to the public Monday to Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. during the summer. In September the library will be open Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and from 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. on Fridays. For more information, visit http://www.library.yale.edu/arts/.

For information on the exhibition or the Richard Minsky Archive, contact Jae Rossman at (203) 432-4439 or jae.rossman@yale.edu. High quality images of the artist and items in the exhibition are also available.


April 15, 2010

Coeducation at Yale

An exhibition marking the 40th anniversary of coeducation at Yale is on display in Sterling Memorial Library's Memorabilia Room (128 Wall Street). Drawn from the collections in Manuscripts and Archives, it explores the timeline leading up to coeducation, the first day on campus for female undergraduates, residential and social life, women's athletics, and the impact of coeducation four decades later.

The exhibition has been organized in conjunction with the WGSS & LGBTS Anniversaries Conference.

March 25, 2010

New Exhibit at Kline Science Library

“Bioinformatics Research Being Carried Out in the Gerstein Lab, Yale University” is a new exhibit at Kline Science Library. It was curated in collaboration with Professor Mark Gerstein and colleagues Chong Shou, Lucas Lochovsky, and Mihali A. Felipe in his Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry Department lab.. The exhibit will be on display through October 2010 and features many images from key articles. Professor Gerstein was also recognized recently as being one of the top twenty-five cited authors by Thomson (ISI) for highly-cited articles in molecular biology and genetics from 2002 through 2006. The Gerstein Lab has put together an online version of the exhibit available here: http://www.library.yale.edu/science/exhibits/.

March 23, 2010

Stover at Yale: Undergraduate Life a Century Ago

In 1910, Yale graduate Owen Johnson introduced the world to John Humperdink Stover in the April 9 issue of The Saturday Evening Post. “Dink,” as Stover was known, was a student at Lawrenceville School and his prep school misadventures were chronicled in ten weekly installments through June 1910. Stover went on to become the hero of Stover at Yale, Johnson’s novel of student life in New Haven at the turn of the twentieth century. F. Scott Fitzgerald, who graduated from Princeton in 1917, called Stover at Yale the “textbook” for his generation. With contemporary letters, publications, photographs, maps, and memorabilia, drawn mainly from Manuscripts and Archives, and manuscript drafts from Johnson’s papers in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, a new exhibition in Sterling Memorial Library’s Memorabilia Room looks at student life at Yale one hundred years ago through the lens of Johnson and Dink Stover.

Stover at Yale was first published serially in McClure’s Magazine beginning in October 1911, with illustrations by Frederick R. Gruger. The novel follows Stover and several of his classmates through the first three years of self-discovery. While there is much about football and college high jinks, Johnson’s writing indicts the American university and the social system that encouraged conformity over individuality, an opinion he made clear in his writing as a student for the Yale Literary Magazine.

The exhibition is free and open to the public Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. The Memorabilia Room is closed weekends and after 4:45 p.m. during the week. Sterling Memorial Library is located at 120 High Street.

Supreme Court Bobbleheads at Yale Law Library

The Green Bag, "An Entertaining Journal of Law," has selected the Lillian Goldman Law Library to be the official archive of its Supreme Court bobblehead dolls. To mark this acquisition, the Rare Book Collection has put a selection of Supreme Court bobbleheads on display, on Level L2 of the Law Library (127 Wall Street), in the wall case at the entrance to the Paskus-Danziger Rare Book Room.

The exhibit was spotlighted in the March 17, 2010 issue of the New York Times ("Relax, Legal Scholars: Bobbleheads Are Safe at Yale."

The Green Bag began issuing its Supreme Court bobbleheads in 2003 with Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist. Subsequently, the bobbleheads have come out roughly in order of seniority, with Justice David H. Souter being the most recent of the sitting Justices (issued shortly before his retirement from the Court).

The bobbleheads have a sophisticated iconography, as Ross E. Davies, editor-in-chief of The Green Bag, explained in the New York Times article: "The bobbleheads are, not to overstate it, a little bit more than toys. They're portrayals of the work and character of these judges." Justice John Paul Stevens, for example, holds a golf club (for his opinion in PGA Tour v. Martin (2001)), and stands on a BetaMax VCR (representing his opinion in Sony v. Universal City Studios (1984), a landmark intellectual property case).

So far, The Green Bag has issued bobbleheads of seven modern Justices (in order of appearance they are William H. Rehnquist, John Paul Stevens, Sandra Day O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, Anthony M. Kennedy, Harry A. Blackmun, and David H. Souter) and two historic Justices (Louis D. Brandeis and Benjamin Curtis, author of a famous dissent to the Dred Scott decision). Forthcoming are small bobbleheads of the first Supreme Court Justices (John Jay, William Cushing, and John Rutledge).

Yale's Supreme Court Bobblehead Collection also includes dozens of "draft" bobbleheads, reflecting earlier stages in their design.

The Green Bag bobbleheads are not the first bobbleheads in the Yale Law Library's Rare Book Collection. That honor goes to the bobblehead of Yale law professor and Dean Emeritus Harold Hongju Koh, which was issued in 2006 as a fundraiser for the Yale Law School chapter of the American Constitution Society.

The Supreme Court Bobblehead exhibit will be on display through the summer of 2010. For more information, contact Mike Widener.

March 16, 2010

On Visigoths and Vikings: The Middle Ages at Yale

A new exhibit in Sterling Memorial Library surveys the study of the Middle Ages at Yale from one of the first books donated to the University and the early history lectures by “Visigoth” Professor George Burton Adamsin in the early 20th century to the Medieval Lunch and Lecture Series and the wildly popular “Vikings!” course offered last year. Along the way the exhibit explores early efforts at interdisciplinary study of the period and the creation in the 1960s of the Medieval Studies Program. It also examines the support given by rich archival holdings and architectural riches of Sterling Memorial Library as well as the superb manuscript collections of the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

The exhibit is timed to coincide with the annual meeting of the Medieval Academy of America (March 18-20, 2010). The conference honors three Yale medievalists with special sessions focusing on their work, and so the lives and work of Robert S. Lopez, Fred C. Robinson, and John E. Boswell are also celebrated. The medievalist community has always had a strong communal spirit, manifested in 2006 by a reunion of graduate medievalists in 2006 entitled “Medieval Spring.” The exhibition represents both the scholarly and social sides of this gathering as well as of the usual round of Lectures and Lunch of medievalists on the Yale campus today.

The exhibit is free and open to the public and runs until April 30.

March 5, 2010

Reused, Rebound, Recovered

Reused, Rebound, Recovered: Medieval Manuscript Fragments in Law Book Bindings
February - May 2010
Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Level L2, Lillian Goldman Law Library
127 Wall Street, New Haven


Nearly 150 early printed books in the Yale Law Library have bindings that incorporate visible pieces of medieval manuscript. A number of these books are featured in the latest exhibit from the Law Library's Rare Book Collection, “Reused, Rebound, Recovered: Medieval Manuscript Fragments in Law Book Bindings.” The exhibit is on display February - May 2010 in the Law Library.

In 15th- and 16th-century Europe, recycling was second nature. Bookbinders, for their part, cut apart discarded medieval manuscripts and reused the strong, flexible, and expensive parchment in their bindings. These scraps reveal information about the distribution and popularity of medieval texts, the evolution of scripts, and the history of printing and binding. A precious few of them preserve the only surviving fragments of long-lost texts.

The exhibit reflects the diversity of medieval material in the Law Library’s bindings. The Bible and liturgical manuscripts are well represented, some with early forms of musical notation. Four of the law books contain legal texts in their bindings. Other examples include a sermon, a fragment of Cicero, and two Hebrew manuscripts. One of the fragments is the oldest item in the Law Library’s collection, dating from around 975-1075.

While most of the fragments are identified and tentatively dated, a couple remain mysteries. The exhibit coincides with the annual meeting of the Medieval Academy of America, March 18-20 at Yale University. Conference attendees will be invited to try their hand at identifying the fragments.

The exhibit was curated by Benjamin Yousey-Hindes, a Ph.D. candidate at Stanford University, and Mike Widener, Rare Book Librarian at the Lillian Goldman Law Library.

The Rare Books Exhibition Gallery is located in the lower level of the Lillian Goldman Law Library (Level L2), directly in front of the Paskus-Danziger Rare Book Reading Room. Those unable to visit the exhibit in person may view it online in the Yale Law Library Rare Books Blog, at http://blogs.law.yale.edu/blogs/rarebooks/.

For more information, phone Mike Widener.

November 4, 2009

Arts Library Showcases Work of Noted Aerial Photographer Robert B. Haas

New Haven, Conn. — An exhibition of aerial photography by noted photographer Robert B. Haas is now on view at Yale’s Haas Family Arts Library, 180 York Street.

The main exhibition has a limited engagement through December, while 16 large pictures by the photographer will remain on permanent display at the Haas Library. An artist’s talk and reception will be held at 5:15 p.m. on November 20. The free event is open to the public.

Yale University Librarian Alice Prochaska said, “Robert Haas is an accomplished artist whose works have been exhibited in New York, Washington, D.C., Europe, South America, China and Australia, and also published in National Geographic Magazine and Time. We are honored that he accepted our invitation to display these extraordinary and moving works of art in Yale’s Haas Family Arts Library.”

The exhibition, “Capturing the Inaccessible,” includes both published and unpublished photographs from three of Haas’ books: “Through the Eyes of the Gods: An Aerial Vision of Africa” (2005), “Through the Eyes of the Condor: An Aerial Vision of Latin America” (2007) and “Through the Eyes of the Vikings: An Aerial Vision of Arctic Lands” (forthcoming), all published by the National Geographic Society. According to Haas, aerial photography weaves together a set of themes into artistic impression. These themes are the vantage point of the winged creature, the view of what lies below and humankind’s exaggerated notion of where it fits into a larger scheme.

Haas is the author and photographer of a series of seven books of photography and the chair of Haas Wheat & Partners, a Dallas-based private investment firm. A graduate of Yale College (1969) and Harvard Law School, he has endowed professorships and has been a frequent lecturer at both institutions. Haas has focused on aerial photography since 2002, and throughout his artistic career he has donated all royalties to schools, libraries, non-profit foundations and wildlife conservation organizations around the world.

The Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library opened in 2008 in the renovated Paul Rudolph Hall and the new Jeffrey H. Loria Center for the History of Art. The library brings together the collections, staf, and other resources from the former Art + Architecture and Drama libraries and the Arts of the Book Collection, as well as staff and services for the Visual Resources Collection. It serves as the library for the Schools of Art, Architecture, and Drama, as well as the Department of the History of Art and the Yale University Art Gallery.

July 28, 2009

Library Celebrates Whiffenpoof Centennial

A series of exhibits in Sterling Memorial Library are helping to mark the Yale Whiffenpoofs 100th birthday. Founded in 1909 at beer-fed Monday night songfests at the old Mory’s Bar on Temple Street, the Whiffenpoofs remain a signature part of “Old Yale.” Today, members of the nation’s oldest collegiate a capella group serve as Yale's musical ambassadors in performances all over the United States, on national television, and in dozens of countries.

Items on display in the exhibits, which are being held in a number of locations in Sterling Memorial Library throughout the summer and fall including the Gilmore Music Library, the Memorabilia Room, and the Sterling Nave, explore the history of the famous "Whiffenpoof Song” and feature historical memorabilia, souvenirs, and artifacts. The exhibits also pay tribute to the Whiffenpoofs’ rich history, their musical legacy, and honors noted alumni like Cole Porter, Senator Prescott Bush, and Fenno Heath.

The founding of the Whiffenpoofs in 1909 also marks the beginning of the American tradition of collegiate, close-harmony a cappella singing groups. The exhibits will cover a timeline from the beginning of the Whiffenpoofs as an extension of the Yale Glee Club, through their role in inspiring college singing groups among Yale underclassmen and throughout the Ivy League, and culminating in the current extracurricular phenomenon of over one thousand a cappella groups in colleges and secondary schools around the country.

The exhibits in Sterling Memorial Library run until late fall 2009. The Gilmore Music Library exhibit will close in September. All exhibits are free and open to the public. Sterling Memorial Library is located at 120 High Street.

Preservation Exhibit at the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

Yale's Medical Historical Library houses one of the world’s finest historical medical collections. The collection contains over 130,000 books, bound manuscripts, journals, and pamphlets. This includes 325 incunabula (books printed between 1450 and 1500), a wonderful Renaissance, Arabic and Persian manuscript collection, and hundreds of bound manuscripts from the 16th to the 20th centuries.

The Cushing/Whitney Historical Library also houses the Fry Collection of Prints and Drawings that spans five centuries, an additional 2,500 portrait engravings and over 2,000 original photographs. The Library also has an artifact collection that includes over 1,000 medical and scientific instruments and the Streeter Collection of Weights and Measures containing several thousands items.

The Preservation Librarian for the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library began working in August 2005 to establish a program that will preserve and conserve these collections. The exhibit, which will be on view until August 28, illustrates issues of preservation and solutions that can be achieved to safeguard this priceless collection. For more information, visit: http://elibrary.med.yale.edu/blog/?p=609.

July 13, 2009

New Exhibit: Islamic Art and Architecture

Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven
Until September 2009

This exhibition on Islamic art and architecture celebrates buildings and artwork commissioned by the rulers of the Islamic Empire and found in the Middle East and parts of Europe.

The books on display feature a variety of structures including mosques and minarets; madrasahs (schools); palaces and private homes; hospitals; hospices; castles and citadels; caravansaries; Sufi zawiyahs, khalwahs, tikiyahs and khaniqahs (religious centers); tombs and mausoleums; sabils (public drinking water fountains); public baths; covered bazaars; glass, ivory, silver gold, jewelry, brass and wood works; ceramics, textiles, embroideries and carpets. Taken together, they explore the important and lasting influence of Islam on European art and architecture.

June 25, 2009

Charles and Joy Sheffey: Medical Missionaries to the Belgian Congo

Divinity School Library, 409 Prospect Street

This exhibit at the Divinity Library provides a glimpse into the life and work of Charles and Joy Sheffey, American Methodist medical missionaries who served in Wembo Nyama, Belgian Congo between 1922 and 1946. Letters and writings of the Sheffeys record their reactions to the African culture and environment they encountered in the Congo. The collection is notable for a large number of artifacts including a messenger drum, musical instruments, woven textiles and handicrafts, jewelry, and a “witch doctor’s magical gourd.”

The exhibit runs until September. For directions and hours, visit the Divinity Library's web site.

June 23, 2009

The Utopian Impulse

An Exhibition in the Memorabilia Room, Sterling Memorial Library
Until August 21, 2009

The “utopian impulse” is the desire to imagine or create a perfect society. Focusing on examples from the 15th through 18th centuries, this exhibition examines the many ways that Early Modern Europeans at home and abroad expressed the utopian impulse, seeking to fashion and explore new or "discovered" ideal societies, paradises lost and found, and perfect, harmonious built environments. Objects on view include architectural treatises and plans, utopian tracts, travel narratives, and maps of real and imagined places.

"The Utopian Impulse" is a collaboration across the collections of the Yale University Libraries, featuring works from the Anne T. & Robert M. Bass Library, the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Manuscripts and Archives, the Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, the Sterling Memorial Library general collections, and the Yale Map Department of Sterling Memorial Library. The exhibition was generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and curated by Mia Reinoso Genoni, Mellon Special Collections Humanities Postdoctoral Fellow. Warm thanks to all who helped make this exhibition possible.

April 28, 2009

New Exhibit Celebrates Franco-Belgian Comics

A new student curated exhibit, “Franco-Belgian Comics”, in Sterling Memorial Library celebrates comics, a 20th century art form found in newspapers, books, journals, and graphics novels. The Franco-Belgian bande dessinée (comic) tradition is one of the strongest in the world and began in newspapers in the 1920s with strips such as Hergé’s Tintin in Belgium’s Le Petit Vingtième weekly supplement. This exhibition will look at the evolution of Franco-Belgian comic strips over a number of decades.

Curated entirely by students, the exhibit also focuses on different aspects of comics, including masters of the bande dessinée, politics in the bande dessinée, movement and stasis, uses of color, realism and surrealism, wordplay, and physical presentation.

The exhibit is on view in the Sterling card catalog gallery from April 30 to July 30.

April 27, 2009

A Soviet Poster Campaign Against Venereal Disease, 1928

The Cushing Rotunda
Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
333 Cedar Street
April 23-May 28, 2009

In 1928, Venereal Diseases and the Fight Against Them, a portfolio of forty posters for exhibition and use in public lectures, was distributed throughout the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic by the People’s Commissariat on Health. “The Soviet government is waging a relentless battle against venereal diseases” the first poster of the series announced. “Participation in this battle is everyone’s duty…”

The exhibit, prepared by Alexander Kazberouk, Yale College Class of 2010, and Curator Susan Wheeler, displays a selection of posters from this recent acquisition to the library’s collections and explains how the posters were used for public education. An on-site computer is available to view the entire set of posters with an English translation.

April 22, 2009

French Liberty. British Slavery. British Responses to the French Revolution

French Liberty. British Slavery. British Responses to the French Revolution
Lewis Walpole Library, 154 Main Street, Farmington, CT
April 17-August 28, 2009

This exhibition explores British responses to the French Revolution and focuses on the period of 1789-1794, from the beginning of the Revolution until the end of the Reign of Terror in France. Whether depicting the brutality and depravity of the events in France, the political divisions in Britain, or considering the nature of liberty and patriotism, the exhibition will look at the British response sparked by the French Revolution, as reflected in satirical prints by James Gillray, Isaac Cruikshank, and others, as well as political pamphlets by Edmund Burke, Mary Wollstonecraft, Richard Price, and others, and manuscript letters from Horace Walpole. All of the works in the exhibition are from the collection of the Lewis Walpole Library. The exhibition was curated by graduate student Julia Elsky (Yale French Department) and will be on view through August 28.

Transportation to Farmington will be available from New Haven for Yale students on a limited basis on April 24 and May 1. Please contact the Library at (860) 677-2140 or walpole@yale.edu for details.

The Lewis Walpole Library is open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:45 p.m., and Tuesday 9 a.m. - 4:45 p.m. The Library is closed on University holidays. The exhibition gallery is open Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00 p.m. when exhibitions are on view. No appointment is required. For more information, visit: www.library.yale.edu/walpole/.


April 13, 2009

Exhibit Celebrates the Art of the Ketubah

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A new exhibit in Yale’s Sterling Memorial Library, The Art of the Ketubah: A Study in Jewish Diversity, celebrates the ketubah (plural ketubot), the marriage contract that Jewish law requires a groom to provide for his bride on their wedding day. The ketubah is intended to protect the woman by establishing the man’s financial obligations to her in case of divorce, as well as provisions for shelter, clothing, and food. Signed by two witnesses and read aloud during the marriage ceremony, the ketubah is an important public and cultural document. The ketubot on display in the exhibit are from the Yale University Library’s Sholem Asch Collection and span from four centuries and many countries. A virtual companion to the exhibit is available here.

Although many Jewish communities have historically decorated their ketubot, during the 17th and 18th centuries Italian Jews perfected the art of ketubah illumination. Italian ketubot from this period commonly feature rich floral ornamentation and images from the Bible as well as from Greek and Roman mythology. They often depict biblical personalities whose names were identical with those of the bride and groom, or they use images to identify their individual attributes like virtue and charity. A special feature of the ketubot of the Jews of Rome is the extended, rounded bottom edge which gave an opportunity to feature either a coat of arms, an object such as an urn, or a floral or geometric design which often include micrographic designs.

Ketubot from Jewish centers in Muslim world, including those in Iran and Afghanistan, are more conservatively decorated, reflecting the prohibition of the creation of graven images, but feature dazzling floral and animal motifs. Those of the Sephardic Diaspora (Jews of Spanish and Portuguese origin) reflect the rich heritage and unique identity of these communities.

The exhibit will be complimented by a lecture by Professor Vivian B. Mann on Tuesday, April 28 at 4:00 p.m. in the Sterling Memorial Library lecture hall (128 Wall Street, New Haven). Mann is Director of the Master’s Program in Jewish Art at the Graduate School of the Jewish Theological Seminary, and Curator Emerita of the Jewish Museum in New York. Her talk, which is co-sponsored by the Judaic Studies Program, is titled “Jewish Marriage Contracts as Documents of Acculturation.”

The exhibit will run until June 30, 2009 and is free and open to the public Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m.-5:45 p.m.; Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m.; Saturday 10:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m.; Sunday 12 noon-5:45 p.m. Hours will change on May 12 and a detailed schedule can he found here.

Image: Ketubah (or marriage contract) from Isfahan (Iran), 1856, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

April 2, 2009

D.I.Y.: Instructions, Directions, Rules, and Recipes

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D.I.Y.: Instructions, Directions, Rules, and Recipes from Manuscripts and Archives is a new exhibit that features items which explain how to do things. Taken from a range of manuscript collections and from the University Archives, the directions cover academic grading and testing, proper behavior in the dorms, knitting, childrearing, traveling abroad, office filing, using gas masks, and a supposedly guaranteed gambling system, among other activities.

The exhibit is on view in the Memorabilia Room in Sterling Memorial Library, Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m through the middle of May. It is free and open to the public. Sterling Memorial Library is located at 120 High Street, New Haven.

April 1, 2009

Early Arabic Printing: Movable Type & Lithographs

A new exhibit in Sterling Memorial Library (across from the stack elevators) explores the history of printed Arabic books and the gradual introduction of the printing press and printing techniques in the Arab world. The first Arabic book printed using movable type was published in Fano, Italy in 1514, and presses supported by the Catholic Church subsequently printed books for the benefit of the Arabic speaking Christians in the Ottoman Empire. Over succeeding decades, religious and secular authorities in the Arab world sought to suppress presses over fears that printers might tamper with sacred religious texts or publish seditious literature. While presses were established in Aleppo (Syria) and Constantinople in the early years of the 18th century, it was only after Napoleon's invasion of Egypt in 1798 that the printing using movable type was widely adopted in the Near East.

The books displayed in the exhibit are drawn from the University Library's Near East Collection. Many volumes were printed using movable type, while others were printed using lithography, a technique invented at the end of the 18th century. Lithography is based on the chemical repellence of oil and water. Designs or text are drawn or painted with greasy ink or crayons on specially prepared stone. The stone is moistened with water, which the stone accepts in areas not covered by the crayon. An oily ink, applied with a roller, adheres only to the drawing and is repelled by the wet parts of the stone. The print is then made by pressing paper against the inked area.

The exhibit is free and open to the public and will run until the end of June, 2009. For more information, contact Simon Samoeil, Curator of the Near East Collection.

March 16, 2009

Treasures: Beautiful and Surprising Finds from the Digitization Project at Yale

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A new exhibit on view near the Sterling Memorial Library's Starr Main Reference Room displays some of the beautiful, charming, and surprising finds from the Library's digitization project. In September 2007, Yale University Library began a large-scale project to digitize 100,000 books from its collections. This was Yale's first mass digitization initiative and was initially sponsored by Microsoft Corporation. The books selected had to meet a specific set of criteria: they had to be in English, printed before 1923 (and thus in the public domain), in good condition, and from specific subject areas, such as Art, Art History, History and Religion. The books were sent to Kirtas Technologies in Wallingford, Connecticut for digitization.

When selecting books, digitization project staff inspected each item to make sure it could withstand scanning. During this inspection process, each book was opened and carefully examined, and sometimes surprises awaited. Staff soon realized that readers stashed all sorts of little treasures in books, from cross-stitch samples to photographs to dried flowers. Leftover paging slips and circulation notices provide information about Yale University Library history. Staff even found a four-leaf clover. (Unfortunately it was too fragile to display.)

Besides items left in books, digitization project staff found many treasures on the pages of the books themselves. Beautiful cover art, illustrations, amusing dedications, and reproductions can be found in many of the books, and they will soon be accessible online and available to any researcher with an Internet connection.

Even though Microsoft withdrew its support from the project in May 2008, the large-scale digitization project will have digitized 35,000 books by June 2009. Currently, staff are selecting books held at the Seeley G. Mudd Library (now closed to readers) and have expanded selection criteria to include other languages and collections, such as the Divinity Collections at Mudd. The Latin American collection at Mudd is particularly rich with treasures and fascinating foldout maps, historically important works, and interesting but inaccessible books are being digitized and will be linked to Yale's online catalog.

The exhibit is free and open to the public and is on view Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m.-5:45 p.m.; Saturday, 10:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m., and Sunday 12 noon-5:45 p.m. Sterling Memorial Library is located at 120 High Street, New Haven.

February 4, 2009

Celebrating Charles Darwin

The University Library is celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin on February 12, 1809, and the 150th anniversary year of his publication of On the Origin of Species with a series of exhibits.

Darwin presented a masterful argument for evolution, synthesizing a wealth of information in a variety of scientific fields including animal husbandry, horticulture, taxonomy, biogeography, geology, paleontology, comparative anatomy and morphology, and embryology. His mechanism for evolutionary change challenged a worldview in Britain and America dominated by natural theology -- the belief that adaptation in the natural world manifested the wisdom and providence of the Creator.

The exhibits, which are free and open to the public, are on display across the library system and examine Darwin's influence on a variety of subjects including music and theology.

Books Written by Charles Darwin and Their Recent Impact
Kline Science Library Lobby, Kline Biology Tower Lower Level
February 1 – April 30

Charles Robert Darwin: February 12, 1809 – April 19, 1882
Kline Science Library Reading Room, Kline Biology Tower Lower Level
February 1 – April 30

Christian Responses to Darwin
Divinity Library Rotunda
February 1 – April 30

From Natural Theology to Natural Selection: Celebrating the Darwin Bicentenary
Medical Library Rotunda
February 1 – April 17

The Nightingale and the Crow: Darwin and Music
Gilmore Music Library
March – April

“Your sincere and heteredox friend” :Charles Darwin’s Letters to James Dwight Dana
Sterling Memorial Library Nave
January 19 – March 27

Fore more information, visit the Library's Darwin website: http://www.med.yale.edu/library/exhibits/darwin/other.html.


January 26, 2009

Your sincere and heteredox friend: Letters from Charles Darwin to James Dwight Dana, 1849-1863

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Sterling Memorial Library
Free and open to the public

"Your sincere and heteredox friend": Charles Darwin's Letters to James Dwight Dana,
1849-1863
celebrates both the 200th anniversary of Darwin's birth and the warm corresponding relationship between these giants of 19th century science and discovery. Darwin and Dana, Silliman Professor of Natural History and Geology in Yale College from 1850 to 1892, never met, but their association as explorers, scholars, and pioneering scientists fostered a rich correspondence between 1849 and 1863. The exhibition features 13 of the 23 letters written by Darwin to Dana and held by Manuscripts and Archives.

January 20, 2009

The Splendor of Hangul: The Korean Script in Calligraphy and Print

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Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven
Free and open to the public

Sponsored by Yale’s East Asia Library, this exhibit celebrates hangul, the alphabet developed in the fifteenth-century by the Korean King Sejong and a group of scholars he convened for this purpose. Featuring print and manuscript books from the Yale Library’s collections, as well as calligraphy by the distinguished artist Dr. Yoo Sung Lee, the exhibit traces the development of hangul styles over time, ranging from early geometric forms through gothic styles and finally to pure abstraction in art.

Until the promulgation of hangul by King Sejong in 1446, Chinese was used to represent the Korean language in print. Chinese characters were ill-suited for this purpose due to major differences between the two languages. Reliance on Chinese was also considered an impediment to the spread of literacy. Even after the systematization of hangul, Chinese continued to be used by elites during the remainder of the Choson dynasty (1392-1910). Even today, Korean can still be written with a mixture of Chinese characters and hangul. This gradual transition is illustrated through the works selected for exhibit.

Dr. Yoo Sung Lee is a professional calligrapher in practice for over thirty years. The pieces on display were chosen to show the development of hangul forms over time and in varying contexts. Some of the works on display were created especially for the exhibit. A native of Seoul, Korea, Dr. Lee has taught, lectured, and demonstrated the art of calligraphy widely. He has exhibited in the United States, France, China, and Korea. He is a member of the Korean American Calligraphy Association and the Art of Ink in American Society and also serves as President the Aram Calligraphy Group. Dr. Lee is the author of the chapter on Korean calligraphy in the World Encyclopedia of Calligraphy (forthcoming, 2009). He currently teaches at the Art Students League of New York.

The books on display are drawn from a number of collections at Yale, including East Asia Library works in Sterling Memorial Library, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and the Haas Family Arts Library Special Collections. The exhibit will run through March 31 and is free and open to the public. Sterling Memorial Library is located at 120 High Street and open Monday through Thursday 8:30 a.m.-5:45 p.m. and Friday 8:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m.; Saturday 10:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m.; Sunday 12 noon-5:45 p.m. The exhibit runs until March 31, 2009.

December 10, 2008

Word and Image: An Exhibition in Sterling Memorial Library

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Word and Image
Sterling Memorial Library Nave
120 High Street
Until March 8, 2009
Free & open to the public

Word and Image has been curated by students in the Yale College seminar Word and Image led by Catherine Labio of the French and Comparative Literature departments. The exhibition examines the relationship between text and image in European, American, and Japanese art and literature. Students have drawn on the many resources of Yale University's libraries and art galleries and designed works of their own to create a theoretical space filled with tension, experimentation and exciting dynamism, where artists and writers from ancient times to the contemporary era interrogate the distinction between drawing and writing, narrative and illustration, reading and seeing.

Arabic Cinema Posters

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Memorabilia Room, Sterling Memorial Library
128 Wall Street
Free & open to the public

Arab Cinema Posters, on view in the Memorabilia Room, displays a selection of some of the 1,200 movie posters recently acquired by the Near Eastern Collection and housed within Manuscripts and Archives. The first Arabic film was produced in Egypt in 1923 and the Arab world boasts an active and prodigious film industry. Advertising films produced in Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, and Iraq, the colorful and engaging posters offer unique insight on both cinematic and social history in the Arab world.

October 20, 2008

Portraits of Painters

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Portraits of Painters: Drawings by George Vertue and Horace Walpole's Anecdotes of Painting in England
Lewis Walpole Library
Farmington, Connecticut
On view until February 25, 2009
Gallery Hours: Wednesday 2:00-4:00 p.m.


The exhibition includes drawings by George Vertue (1684-1756) as well as the related prints published in volumes of Horace Walpole’s Anecdotes of Painting, published between 1762 and 1771.

The Lewis Walpole Library is a research library for eighteenth-century studies and the prime source for the study of Horace Walpole and Strawberry Hill. Its collections include significant holdings of eighteenth-century British books, manuscripts, prints, drawings and paintings, as well as important examples of the decorative arts. Housed in an historic frame house in Farmington and given to Yale by Wilmarth Sheldon Lewis and Annie Burr Lewis, the Lewis Walpole Library is a department of Yale University Library.

Long Road to Freedom: A 90th Birthday Tribute to Nelson Mandela

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Long Road to Freedom: A 90th Birthday Tribute to Nelson Mandela
Sterling Memorial Library
October-December 2008

This exhibition traces important events in Mandela's life including his early years and schooling, his increasing militancy, political activities, arrests, and imprisonment, as well as his release and election as the first post-Apartheid president of South Africa. The exhibit also features fascinating Mandela-related ephemera, such as a pillow, a placemat, an apron, tee-shirts, a handbag, and a puzzle. Materials on display are drawn from Sterling Memorial Library, the African Collection in Manuscripts and Archives, and the collection of Dorothy Woodson, African Collection curator.

The exhibit is free and open to the public Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:45; Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.; and Sunday 12 noon to 5:45 p.m. Sterling Memorial Library is located at 120 High Street, New Haven. “Long Road to Freedom” runs until December, 2008.

September 26, 2008

Noah Webster: American Patriot and Yale Loyalist

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An exhibition celebrating the 250th birthday of lexicographer Noah Webster has opened in the Memorabilia Room in Sterling Memorial Library. Titled "Noah Webster: American Patriot and Yale Loyalist," the exhibition demonstrates that Webster, Yale class of 1778, M.A. 1781, and Honorary Doctor of Laws 1823, was far more than just a brilliant compiler of dictionaries. His astoundingly various contributions to his country and his proud identity as a Yale man are vividly displayed in this collection of manuscripts, books, and artifacts, reflecting a lifetime of accomplishment, innovation, and unflagging patriotism.

Webster played a major role in the drafting and ratification of the Constitution and played a crucial impact on the development of the American educational system. The father of copyright legislation in the United States, Webster also served in elected offices both in Connecticut and Massachusetts, and played an important role in the creation of Amherst College.

These diverse achievements and more are represented in the sections like Webster the Yale Man, Webster the Patriot, and Webster the Historian, but Noah Webster was also a lawyer, a teacher, an ecologist, a geographer, a moralist, and above all a founding "uncle," if not a founding father, of his country. His triumphant achievement as a landmark lexicographer of the English language has hitherto overshadowed his many and important accomplishments in other areas.

The exhibition will be on display through the end of November. It is free and open to the public during scheduled library hours. Sterling Memorial Library is located at 120 High Street, New Haven, Connecticut.

August 1, 2008

Library Staff Art Exhibition

Until September 30
Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven, Connecticut

This exhibition in Sterling Memorial Library's exhibit corridor showcases original art, photographs, and decorative objects by the talented and creative staff of Yale University Library. The exhibition is sponsored by the Library Staff Association.

July 9, 2008

The Silk Road

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Tang Dynasty robe, excavated in the Caucasus.
Hermitage Museum, St. Peterburg, Russia


The Silk Road
July 1 - September 30
Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven, Connecticut

This exotic name for the trade routes, or rather the trade networks, connecting China with the Mediterranean and Mongolia with India was only invented in the nineteenth century. However, trade and cultural exchange has flourished along these routes for millennia, in spite of natural barriers, such as the tallest mountains in Asia, vast deserts, frequent earthquakes, not to mention different languages, religions and cultures. Archaeological excavations in China and the Middle East show us the extent to which ideas, designs and forms were exchanged already in the 2nd millennium BC.

On display are photographs and objects from the Babylonian Collection. The exhibition is free and open to the public during regular library hours.

June 30, 2008

Of Typewriters and Sleigh Bells: A Celebration of Leroy Anderson

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Of Typewriters and Sleigh Bells: A Celebration of Leroy Anderson
June 27-August 29 2008
Gilmore Music Library, Sterling Memorial Library

This exhibition in honor of the 100th anniversary of the birth of composer Leroy Anderson features seven musical manuscripts in Anderson’s hand, including the immortal Sleigh Ride, as well as unusual artifacts such as Anderson’s baton, the typewriter that was used as a musical instrument in The Typewriter, and Connecticut Governor Jodi Rell’s official proclamation declaring June 29, 2008 Leroy Anderson Day.

The exhibition is free and open to the public during regular library hours.

Continue reading "Of Typewriters and Sleigh Bells: A Celebration of Leroy Anderson" »

June 26, 2008

"The Eponymous Dozen"

"The Eponymous Dozen": Naming Yale's 12 Residential Colleges
Until August 28, 2008
Sterling Memorial Library, across from entrance to Starr Main Reference Room
120 High Street, New Haven, Connecticut

This exhibition tells the stories behind the names of Yale's existing colleges. It includes photographs and artifacts related to the eleven men (including the two Yale presidents named Timothy Dwight) and two places for which Yale's colleges have been named.

May 28, 2008

Family and Community Archives Project

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Family and Community Archives Project
May 28-July 2008
Exhibits Corridor, Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven

This exhibition of materials assembled by students from New Haven's Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School tells the stories of their families and neighborhoods. It was created through the Family and Community Archives Project, an initiative conceived by twenty-one Yale University Library archivists to introduce New Haven high school students to the archival profession and the work of professional archivists. Over nine weeks, 113 juniors and their teachers in “United States History II” learned how to find and care for photographs, documents, and artifacts, and learned how to do research using primary sources.

The exhibition is free and open to the public and runs until the end of July, 2008

May 27, 2008

Class of 1958 Exhibition

Memorabilia Room, Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven

An exhibition in Sterling Memorial Library's Memorabilia Room celebrating the class of 1958 and their 50th reunion year. Materials on display include the many published works produced by members of the class over the past five decades.

The exhibition is free and open to the public during regular library hours.

May 26, 2008

Treasures from the Music Library

Treasures from the Special Collections of the Music Library
and the American Musical Theatre Collection

May-June 2008
Gilmore Music Library, Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven

A sampling of music manuscripts and editions, photographs, and realia aimed to please many tastes in music.

May 20, 2008

A World of Letters

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A World of Letters: Yale University Press, 1908-2008
May-July 2008
Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven, Connecticut

This new exhibition celebrates the centennial of Yale University Press, founded in 1908 to advance learning through the publication of books that contribute to an understanding of human affairs in arts or sciences. Items on display include Yale University Press catalogues, memorabilia, historical documents, and examples of just some of the eight thousand books printed by the press over the last one hundred years.

The exhibition is also the first to installed in the newly reconceived exhibition space under the arches of Sterling Memorial Library.

A World of Letters: Yale University Press, 1908-2008 is free and open to the public.

For more information on Yale University Press, visit their web site.

The Passover Haggadah: Modern Art in Dialogue with an Ancient Text

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The Passover Haggadah: Modern Art in Dialogue with an Ancient Text
Until June 27, 2008
Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven, Connecticut

The Passover Haggadah is a composite text made up of biblical, rabbinic and liturgical passages and ancient folk songs. Scholars believe that the earliest versions were assembled sometime in the first century of the Common Era, during the late Second Temple Period in Palestine. The Haggadah was--and still is--read on Passover eve during the Seder, a ceremony commemorating the Israelites’ delivery from Egyptian bondage.

Continue reading "The Passover Haggadah: Modern Art in Dialogue with an Ancient Text" »

May 10, 2008

Art Is Where You Find It

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February-May 2008
Memorabilia Room, Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven, Connecticut

Art lovers don't often think of the library or archive as a place to study original works of art, but this exhibition showcases pencil sketches, watercolors, cartoons, caricatures, and ephemera from the records of the University or from the collections of personal or family papers in Manuscripts and Archives.

Continue reading "Art Is Where You Find It" »

May 9, 2008

Ibn Khaldun

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Until May 27, 2008
Exhibitions Corridor
Sterling Memorial Library
120 High Street, New Haven, Connecticut

An exhibition of books by and about the North African scholar Ibn Khaldun (Tunis 1332- Cairo 1406) in the Yale collections. Featuring modern and contemporary editions in Arabic, Bahasa Indonesia, English, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian, Spanish.

Ibn Khaldun is free and open to the public.