Alexander III (1881-1894)
Alexander III

Portait of Alexander IIIThe assassination of his father, Alexander II, in 1881 confirmed Alexander III in his conviction of the merit of firm, uncompromising leadership, the need to suppress sedition and to check any tendencies which might prejudice the Czar’s position. He was unsympathetic to and largely uncomprehending of the intellectual and social ferment among his subjects.

During the first five years of his reign Alexander III retained the regular ruble type which had not changed since 1860. For the coronation ceremonies in 1883 it was decided to issue a special coronation ruble which would take the place of the traditional lesser coronation medals and jetons. In 1885 the Mint’s operating structure as well as the entire Russian monetary system was extensively revised. A new portrait type for gold and large silver coins was introduced.

 

coin thumbnail
2001.87.375

coin thumbnail
2001.87.376

coin thumbnail
2001.87.376

Two silver rubles, the first coin, from 1883, shows the imperial crown.

Collection of Coins and Medals
Yale University Art Gallery
Gift of Rev. William H. Owen

2001.87.375

The second piece, 1892, depicts Alexander III.

Collection of Coins and Medals
Yale University Art Gallery
Gift of Rev. William H. Owen

2001.87.376

Various silver kopecks:

25 kopecks (1891)

Collection of Coins and Medals
Yale University Art Gallery
Gift of Rev. William H. Owen

2001.87.377

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20 kopecks (1888)

Collection of Coins and Medals
Yale University Art Gallery
Gift of Rev. William H. Owen

2001.87.380

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20 kopecks (1893)

Collection of Coins and Medals
Yale University Art Gallery
Gift of Rev. William H. Owen

2001.87.381

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10 kopecks (1885)

Collection of Coins and Medals
Yale University Art Gallery
Gift of Rev. William H. Owen

2001.87.378

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5 kopecks (1884)

Collection of Coins and Medals
Yale University Art Gallery
Gift of Rev. William H. Owen

2001.87.379

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