Programs & Exhibitions

Study Days, Seminars, Workshops, Master Classes, Classes

Study Days, Seminars, Workshops, Colloquia, etc.

Master Classes Classes

Conceptualizing the "Age of Democratic Revolutions"

A Contest of Two Genres: Graphic Satire and British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century

The Comic Image 1800–1850: Narrative and Caricature

Individual Class Sessions

In-class instruction on campus

 

Study Days, Seminars, Workshops, Colloquiua, and Master Classes

The Library often offers study days, seminars, workshops, colloquia, and master classes throughout the year. The Lewis Walpole Library is currently offering a graduate student colloquium and master classes. Details are below.

For questions or more information please write to Cynthia Roman cynthia.roman@yale.edu or Nicole Bouché nicole.bouche@yale.edu.

To view the "James Gillray's Hogarthian Progresses" exhibition poster with programs listed, click here.

For information about other past seminars, workshops, and master classes, click here.

The Library welcomes inquiries about and suggestions for future study days, seminars, workshops, colloquia, and master classes. Please contact Cynthia Roman cynthia.roman@yale.edu or Susan Walker susan.walker@yale.edu.

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Study Days, Seminars, Workshops, Colloquia, etc.

boswell image for lectureMiller, John, 1715-1790?
James Boswell, Esqr. in the dress of an armed Corsican chief : in the dress of an armed Corsican chief, as he appear'd at Shakespeare's Jubilee at Stratford upon Avon, September 1769

 

David Bell

photo courtesy of Joseph Bell

 

Graduate Colloquium

Conceptualizing the "Age of Democratic Revolutions”

David A. Bell
Sidney and Ruth Lapidus Professor, Department of History, Princeton University

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Hall of Graduate Studies, Room 211
1320 York Street
New Haven

What does it mean to talk about 'Atlantic Revolutions'? The talk will examine the ways that the concept has been formulated since the days of R.R. Palmer, and examine the ways in which it is, and is not useful for historians of the period.

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Master Classes

lwlpr22633

William Hogarth (1697-1764)
The Battle of the Pictures
. 1744/45

Master Class

A Contest of Two Genres: Graphic Satire and British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century

Mark Salber Phillips, Professor of History at Carleton University, Ottawa
Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings at the Lewis Walpole Library

August 22–26, 2016

Centuries-old hierarchies of the visual arts have placed history painting and graphic satire at opposite ends of the spectrum. “History painting” -- high minded narrative art depicting exemplary heroes and events— carried enormous prestige, bringing fame to the individual artist as well as to the national school. In contrast, graphic satire was viewed as the lowest form of visual expression -- more closely connected to political prints than to high-minded "histories."

This residential seminar is intended to give doctoral students in a variety of disciplines the opportunity to consider issues and overlaps between these two narrative genres. Making use of visual material and textual recourses from the collections of the Lewis Walpole Library's at Yale, we will examine the often-embattled efforts of artists to construct new modes of visual representation as well as of narrative and history.  Through a multidisciplinary approach, we  will take note of a variety of key issues, including the theoretical context of Enlightenment intellectual history, the more focused discourse of art treatises, and direct encounters with the formal and aesthetic qualities of works of art. Among history painters we will give our attention to the works of William Hogarth, Gavin Hamilton, Benjamin West, and John Trumbull, while among the satirists we will focus on James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, and Isaac and George Cruikshank.

The class will be taught as a combination of seminars, small group discussions, and visits to the Yale Center for British Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. Most of the teaching will take place in the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington.

The program is open by application. Preference will be given to graduate students. For further details contact Cynthia Roman cynthia.roman@yale.edu

Transportation: Yale Shuttle to and from New Haven 
Accommodation at the Library’s Timothy Root House may be available at no charge upon inquiry. 

lwlpr13741

Robert Seymour (1798-1836)
"Vel I dos'nt think it can be blasphemy for us to sing out ... "

London: Published by G.S. Tregear 1835?

Master Class

The Comic Image 1800–1850: Narrative and Caricature

Brian Maidment, Professor of the History of Print, Liverpool John Moores University
Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings at the Lewis Walpole Library

September 14, 1 pm, to September 16, 4 pm

Despite the rather specialized topic suggested by the title, this residential seminar aims to introduce participants both to the broad interpretative issues raised by studying prints and graphic images and to the range of collections available at the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington.

While the Library has an extremely rich collection of eighteenth-century caricature and political satire prints by such well-known artists as William Hogarth, James Gillray, and Thomas Rowlandson, it also has an extraordinarily wide range of comic images from the first half of the nineteenth century, images which evolve or re-invent traditions of caricature and satiric narrative to bear on social themes, especially the day to day experience of urban life. Less widely studied and reproduced than the caricatures of the late eighteenth century, this corpus of early nineteenth-century prints nonetheless forms an excellent starting place for studying the graphic tradition and tracing changes in narrative strategies. As political and personal satire gave way to a focus on wider socio-cultural themes in comic image-making, intaglio engraving was substantially replaced by lithography and wood engraving as the favored media, thus opening up new possibilities in combining printed texts and illustration. These rapid changes in mode and subject combined with a volatile and experimental marketplace to re-define the nature of humor in this period.

The residential seminar is intended to provide an opportunity for students across disciplines to work with the Lewis Walpole Library's collections and to think over issues to do with the value, status, and methodological challenges offered by the study of graphic material. No previous experience of working with prints or other graphic images is required. The number of participants is limited, and preference is given to graduate students.

The class will be taught through a range of small group workshops and discussions centered on the Library collections. It will be led by Brian Maidment and Cynthia Roman, and build on the experience of many previous successful classes in Farmington.

The program is open by application. Preference will be given to graduate students. For further details contact Cynthia Roman cynthia.roman@yale.edu

Transportation: Yale Shuttle to and from New Haven 
Accommodation at the Library’s Timothy Root House may be available at no charge upon inquiry. 

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Classes

Individual Class Sessions

The Library welcomes visits by undergraduate and graduate classes from Yale and other institutions.

Members of the staff are available to work with faculty and teaching graduate students to develop and arrange special sessions to present materials on individual topics or in particular formats and to talk to students about the collection. Members of the Library staff are happy to assist instructors in identification and selection of appropriate collection items for presentation in class.

Classes provide students with an opportunity for a hands-on introduction to eighteenth-century primary source materials.

Flexible teaching options:

The classroom

We are also happy to arrange transportation for classes between New Haven and Farmington.

For further information or to schedule a class visit, contact

Susan Walker, Head of Public Services, susan.walker@yale.edu, 860-677-2140

 

In-Class Instruction Sessions on Campus

Members of the staff are available to come to class on campus to talk to students about the Library and its holdings relevant to the particular course. Presentations introduce students to the Library's collections as a source of material they can draw upon for their research and course assignments.

For further information or to schedule a visit to class, contact

Susan Walker, Head of Public Services, at susan.walker@yale.edu, 860-677-2140

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