Programs & Exhibitions

Workshops, Master Classes, Classes

Workshops Master Classes Classes

"We are an injured body": Collectivity and the Female body
Jill Campbell, October 2, 2015

Expressive Bodies in Eighteenth-Century Satirical Prints
Amelia Rauser, October 30, 2015

 

Individual Class Sessions

Workshops and Master Classes

The Library often offers workshops and master classes throughout the year. The Lewis Walpole Library has two workshops scheduled for this autumn in connection with the exhibition "Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women."

The Library recently offered a residential two-day workshop for graduate students: Representing Slavery in Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Britain as well as two residential master classes for graduate students: British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century and Caricature and the Comic Image, 1800-1850. For questions or more information please write to Cynthia Roman cynthia.roman@yale.edu or Nicole Bouché nicole.bouche@yale.edu.

For a list of other past master classes and workshops click here.

The Library welcomes inquiries about and suggestions for future workshops and master classes. Please contact Cynthia Roman at cynthia.roman@yale.edu or Susan Walker at susan.walker@yale.edu.

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Workshops

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Thomas Rowlandson. Breaking up of the Blue Stocking Club, ca. 1815. The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University, 815.03.01.04+

“We are an injured body”: Collectivity and the Female Body

Workshop for Graduate Students

October 2, 2015

Jill Campbell, Department of English, Yale University

The Lewis Walpole Library

Using literary examples of eighteenth-century and early nineteenth-century representations of women as well as graphic images from the exhibition "Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women", this workshop will explore the interactions between two meanings of the word “body”:  the physical structure or substance of a person, and an organized group of individuals.  Jane Austen plays across these two senses in Northanger Abbey when she complains that women novelists, so routinely derided and abused by reviewers and readers, are “an injured body.”  Her phrase evokes the vulnerability of an individual physical body while the passage it appears in implies that the fervor of attacks on women novelists may arise partly from their corporate prominence and force.  Austen stirringly calls on her sister novelists to take pride in their collective achievements, and not to “desert one another.”

The prospect of such solidarity among aspiring women provokes distrust and anxiety in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and satirists often link images of women’s transgressive corporeal bodies with evocations of the monstrosity of women’s incorporation as a group.  Rowlandson’s “Breaking Up of the Blue-Stocking Club” (1815) provides a prime example of how the threat of unruliness in individual female bodies escalates when they assemble on their own.  The word “bawdy” itself encapsulates this threat:  the bawd dares to constitute and manage a group of working women herself.  From the Augustan age through the nineteenth century, women writers and artists are particularly discouraged from conceptualizing or organizing themselves as a collective tradition or united group.

We will examine a range of visual and verbal treatments of women’s corporate and corporeal “bawdiness” and the implications of links between the two.  Workshop participants will select individual works for discussion.

While priority is given to Yale graduate students, the Library also welcomes graduate students from other universities to apply. To apply, please send one pdf containing a brief statement of interest, c.v., and letter of academic reference to Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, cynthia.roman@yale.edu.

 

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Anonymous. Inconvenience of Dress, 1786. The Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University, 786.05.19.01

Expressive Bodies in Eighteenth-Century Satirical Prints

Workshop for Graduate Students

October 30, 2015

Amelia Rauser, Professor of Art History, Franklin & Marshall College

The Lewis Walpole Library

Satirical prints made in late eighteenth-century England glory in the use of the caricatural visual language to deform subjects’ faces for expressive effect. But how should we read these figures’ bodies? Fat, thin, lumpen, unclothed, extravagant in gesture and in costume, satirical bodies were deployed by printmakers to lampoon, castigate, and celebrate their subjects. Such expressive bodies imply a concept of subjectivity—and even cognition—that is itself particularly embodied. In this workshop, we will investigate eighteenth-century embodiment in satire and fashion. In a session devoted to “Celebrity Bodies,” we will sample current scholarship on “celebrity studies” and discuss the applicability of this concept to eighteenth-century representations. And in a session on “Fashionable Bodies,” we will study the changing silhouettes of fashionable dress in the eighteenth-century—not only in print representations, but also by handling and even trying on costumes made in these silhouettes, to come to a better understanding of how they framed the body and shaped its movement.

While priority is given to Yale graduate students, the Library also welcomes graduate students from other universities to apply. To apply, please send one pdf containing a brief statement of interest, c.v., and letter of academic reference to Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, cynthia.roman@yale.edu.

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Master Classes

 

There are no Master Classes scheduled at this time.

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Classes

Individual Class Sessions

The Library welcomes visits by undergraduate and graduate classes from Yale and other institutions.

Members of the staff are available to work with faculty and teaching graduate students to develop and arrange special sessions to present materials on individual topics or in particular formats and to talk to students about the collection. Members of the Library staff are happy to assist instructors in identification and selection of appropriate collection items for presentation in class.

Classes provide students with an opportunity for a hands-on introduction to eighteenth-century primary source materials.

Flexible teaching options:

The classroom

We are also happy to arrange transportation for classes between New Haven and Farmington.

For further information or to schedule a class visit, contact

Susan Walker, Head of Public Services, at susan.walker@yale.edu, 860-677-2140

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