Programs & Exhibitions

Workshops, Master Classes, Classes

Workshops

Master Classes

  Classes

Representing Slavery in Eighteenth-century Atlantic Britain

9-10 December, 2014

British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century

18-22 August 2014

Caricature and the Comic Image, 1800-1850

4-6 September 2014

 

Workshops and Master Classes

Representing Slavery in Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Britain
Workshop for Graduate Students

9 – 10 December 2014
The Yale Center for British Art, New Haven
The Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington

For more details about this upcoming workshop, click here.

Space is limited. The deadline for receipt of applications is 24 November, 2014. For workshop application details, click here.

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The Library also offers week-long and one-day master classes throughout the year. The Lewis Walpole Library recently offered two residential master classes for graduate students: British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century and Caricature and the Comic Image, 1800-1850. For questions or more information please write to Cynthia Roman cynthia.roman@yale.edu or Nicole Bouché nicole.bouche@yale.edu.

For a list of other past master classes and workshops click here.

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Workshops

Charles Stanhope

Sir Joshua Reynolds. Charles Stanhope, third Earl of Harrington, and a Servant. Yale Center for British Art.

 

Prospects of Empire

Henry R. Cocok after William Blake and Michele Benedetti. The Skinning of the Aboma Snake. Indian Female of the Arrowauka Nation. The Lewis Walpole Library.

Representing Slavery in Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Britain
Workshop for Graduate Students
9 – 10 December 2014
The Yale Center for British Art, New Haven
The Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington

In December 2014, The Lewis Walpole Library and the Yale Center for British Art will jointly host a two-day workshop for graduate students focusing on two current Yale University exhibitions related to the visual culture of slavery,  Figures of Empire:  Slavery and Portraiture in Eighteenth- Century Atlantic Britain and Prospects of Empire: Slavery and Ecology in Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Britain.  The workshop will provide an opportunity to explore these complementary exhibitions in depth and to examine additional materials related to the topic selected from the rich holdings of both institutions with curatorial and academic scholars working in the field. The workshop is open to graduate students from a variety of disciplines whose work would benefit from participation in this collaborative exploration of the topic.

Prospects of Empire is curated by Heather Vermeulen, Doctoral Candidate in African American Studies and American Studies, Yale University, and Hazel V. Carby, Charles C. & Dorathea S. Dilley Professor of African American Studies and Professor of American Studies, Yale University. The exhibition explores the notion of empire’s “prospects”—its gaze upon bodies and landscapes, its speculations and desires, its endeavors to capitalize upon seized land and labor, as well as its failures to manage enslaved persons and unruly colonial ecologies. For further exhibition details, please click here.

Figures of Empire is curated by Esther Chadwick and Meredith Gamer, PhD candidates in the Department of the History of Art at Yale University, and Cyra Levenson, Associate Curator of Education at the Yale Center for British Art. The exhibition explores the coincidence of slavery and portraiture in eighteenth-century Britain. For further exhibition details, please click here.

The workshop will take place at the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, and the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington and will offer exhibition walk-throughs with the curators of each exhibition, and additional presentations and conversation in a study room setting. Lead discussants for the workshop will be Gillian Forrester, Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings, Yale Center for British Art, and Dian Kriz, Professor Emerita, Art History, Brown University. Additional participating scholars working in the field include Paul Grant Costa, Executive Editor, Yale Indian Papers Projec,t and Marisa Fuentes, Assistant Professor, Women's and Gender Studies and History, Rutgers University.

The program will also include a talk at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday at the Yale Art School by artist Fred Wilson, whose groundbreaking project Mining the Museum (1992-93) at the Maryland Historical Society initiated his ongoing critique of the ways in which museums consciously or unwittingly reinforce racist beliefs and behavior, followed by a walk-through of Figures of Empire with the artist at 4:00 p.m.

Participants will be provided with accommodations at the Lewis Walpole Library guest house in Farmington, Connecticut. Shuttle transportation between Farmington and New Haven will be provided.  A syllabus and list of readings will be provided in advance of the workshop.

Application Procedures:

Applications must be submitted electronically. Please include a CV and a brief statement (of no more than one page) outlining how your research interests intersect with the focus of this workshop and what benefits you expect from participating.

Applications and questions about content, organization or practicalities of the workshop should be emailed to:

Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings and Paintings, The Lewis Walpole Library
cynthia.roman@yale.edu

Space is limited. The deadline for receipt of applications is Monday, 1 December 2014.

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Master Classes

SigismundaDunkarton after Hogarth, Sigismunda, 1793.


Columbus breaking the eggHogarth, Columbus Breaking the Egg. 1753.

British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century

August 18-22, 2014

taught by Mark Salber Phillips, Professor of History at Carleton University, Ottawa
and
Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings at the Lewis Walpole Library

The residential seminar was intended to give doctoral students in a number of disciplines the opportunity to consider issues of history painting using both visual material and textual resources from the Lewis Walpole Library's collections. This course explored the often-embattled efforts of artists (including William Hogarth, Gavin Hamilton, Benjamin West and John Trumbull among others) to construct new modes of visual representations of narrative history and national history in particular. A multidisciplinary approach provided the theoretical context of Enlightenment intellectual history, the more focused discourse of art treatises, and direct encounters with the formal and aesthetic qualities of works of art.

The class was taught as a combination of lecture presentations, discussions, and small-group activities and included visits to the Yale Center for British Art, the Yale University Art Gallery, and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. Most of the teaching took place in the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington and was led by Mark Salber Phillips, Professor of History at Carleton University, Ottawa, and Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings at the Lewis Walpole Library.

The course was intended primarily for Yale students, but a limited number of places were available to graduate students from other universities.

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honi soit qui mal y pense
Theodore Lane. Honi soit qui mal y pense, 1821

 

artists repository
Edward Hull. Artist's repository, 1827

 

 

Caricature and the Comic Image, 1800-1850

September 4-6, 2014

Taught by Brian Maidment, Professor of the History of Print, Liverpool John Moores University
and
Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings at the Lewis Walpole Library

This residential seminar was aimed at providing graduate students across a range of academic subjects with an introduction to some of the ways that graphic images might be used as an important element in research. Built around the magnificent holdings of British caricatures and satirical prints held in the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington, the class provided students with an introduction to the various methods through which graphic images are made and reproduced and featured workshops organized around the interpretative and historiographical issues raised by the academic study of prints. The focus was on the period between 1800 and 1850 when political caricature began to give way to various forms of humorous prints that offered a satirical socio-political perspective on society. In particular, humorous prints at this time engaged with issues concerning the social changes being brought about by urbanization, industrialization, and class formation. 

This seminar was taught through small group sessions that engaged with primary material drawn from the Library’s collections, and there was an opportunity for students to gain some sense of the extent and nature of the collections held in Farmington. No previous experience of working with prints or other graphic images was required.

The seminar began in the late afternoon on Thursday, September 4, with a visit to the Beinecke Library, which suggested some of the ways in which graphic images begin to invade texts in the 1820s and 1830s. The seminar moved to the Lewis Walpole Library for September 5 and 6.

The course was intended primarily for Yale students, but a limited number of places were available to graduate students from other universities.

For Master Class handouts, click here.

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Classes

Individual Class Sessions

The Library welcomes visits by undergraduate and graduate classes from Yale and other institutions. Members of the staff are delighted to work with faculty and teaching graduate students to develop and arrange special sessions presenting materials on individual topics or in particular formats and to talk to students about the collection. Classes provide students with an opportunity for a hands-on introduction to eighteenth-century primary source materials. We are also happy to arrange transportation for classes between New Haven and Farmington.

The Library is able to accommodate classes of up to 24 students in a classroom equipped with a wireless internet connection and data projector.

For further information or to schedule a class visit, contact

Susan Walker, Head of Public Services, at susan.walker@yale.edu

or

Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, at cynthia.roman@yale.edu.

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