Programs & Exhibitions

Past Master Classes / Classes

One-day Master Classes & Workshops

April 19, 2013 Sugar and the confectioner in eighteenth-century England

  January 28, 2011 Portrait Prints as                         History

Week-long Master Classes

Aug 20-24, 2012 British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century

Dec 7, 2012 Facing the Text: Understanding Extra-illustration in the long Eighteenth Century. Sept. 30, 2011 Sacred Satire: Lampooning Religious Belief in Eighteenth-Century Britain October 28, 2010 Literary Techniques in popular scientific biography: A Writer's Experience Aug 22-28, 2011 British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century

May 19, 2012 Hogarth to Cruikshank: The Comic Image 1750-1850

May 14, 2011 Hogarth to Cruikshank:  the  Comic Image 1750-1850    May 16-20, 2011  Caricature & the Comic Image: 1800-1850-Master Class Handouts (May) link

Past Master Classes and Workshops

One-day Master Classes and Workshops

The Lewis Walpole Library offers a variety of learning opportunities throughout the year. One-day master classes and workshops are most often intended for graduate students and held in Farmington, although participants have included faculty, curators, and members of the public.

"Sugar and the confectioner in eighteenth-century England"

 

The Lost Art of the Officier

 

Presentation and workshop by British food historian Ivan Day

 

Friday, April 19, 2013, 11:00 – 2:30

 

The Lewis Walpole Library
Yale University
Farmington, CT 06032

 

For Yale Graduate Students and Faculty

.Ivan Day confection

The officier or confectioner was the most skilled food professional in great house and palace kitchens. As well as having the skills to make a whole host of dessert foods, such as wafers, comfits, ices etc. the officier designed and produced ambitious table ornaments made from sugar and other edible materials. Using original eighteenth and nineteenth century equipment, including some rare sugar moulds, British food historian Ivan Day demonstrated how these intricate pieces of edible art were constructed and gave participants a unique opportunity to learn the basics of the art yourself. Ivan also introduced participants to the extraordinary history of this eccentric culinary art with a brief lecture, including many images of his own recreations. 

The number of participants was limited.

 

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One-Day Master Class on Extra-illustration--December 7, 2012

Facing the Text: Understanding Extra-illustration in the long Eighteenth Century.
A one day hands-on workshop
led by Dr Lucy Peltz, National Portrait Gallery, London.
7 December 2012                  

Extra-illustration, or ‘grangerizing’, was the process by which readers and collectors customized published books with thematically linked prints, watercolors and other visual material. This was an enormously popular and sociable fashion, from the late eighteenth to the mid nineteenth century, and thousands of extra-illustrated volumes survive in museums, libraries and private collections in Britain and the USA. Apart from a handful of early precursors, extra-illustration began to take shape in the 1770s and 1780s among an elite circle of amateurs and antiquarians surrounding Horace Walpole. Extra-illustrated volumes document the growing interest in print collecting and the increasing taste for antiquarianism and biography. They also provide insight into the eighteenth-century taste for portraiture and the emerging historical imagination. In this one-day hands-on workshop, Dr Lucy Peltz provided an introduction to her research and draw on Yale’s exceptional historical resources to explore the rise, popularization of socio-cultural meanings of extra-illustration in the long eighteenth century.

Dr Lucy Peltz is Curator of Eighteenth-Century Collections at the National Portrait Gallery, London. She has had a long relationship with Yale, having first held a fellowship at the Lewis Walpole Library in 1995. More recently, she was co-curator, with Peter Funnell (National Portrait Gallery) and Cassandra Albinson (British Art Center, Yale), of Thomas Lawrence: Regency Power and Brilliance (2010-11). In addition to her research on other portrait-led exhibition projects, including Brilliant Women: 18th Century Bluestockings (2008), Lucy specializes in the workings of the art market, portrait print collecting and the rise and popularity of extra-illustration in eighteenth-century Britain. She is currently completing a monograph on this subject which is provisionally-titled Facing the Text: the Social History of Extra-Illustration, 1769-1840 (to be published by The Huntington Library Press, anticipated 2014).

For more information, please contact Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, 860-677-2140, or cynthia.roman@yale.edu.

 

 

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Saturday, May 19, 2012

Hogarth to Cruikshank: the Comic Image 1750-1850

For several years the Lewis Walpole Library has hosted Brian Maidment's highly popular one-week master class for Yale graduate students (see below).

This year for the first time, the Library invited senior scholars from a variety of disciplines whose research encompasses graphic satire and caricature to a one-day workshop with Professsor Maidment, Research Professor in the History of Print at Salford University in Manchester, UK, and Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings at the LWL.

The workshop addressed important past and current scholarship on comic imagery and visual humor between 1750 and 1850. The day was an opportunity for participants to share current research projects with colleagues and for the group to frame larger questions and new directions for scholarship.

Early registration was encouraged as the number of participants was limited.

For more information, please contact Cynthia Roman, 860-677-2140, or cynthia.roman@yale.edu.

 

One-day Master Class for Yale Graduate Students

September 30, 2011

Sacred Satire: Lampooning Religious Belief in Eighteenth-Century Britain

sacred satire master class

Misty Anderson, Associate Professor of English, University of Tennessee, led a one-day seminar for Yale graduate students. The course explored satiric images of Dissenters, Methodists, and Roman Catholics, as well as established Anglican clergy. These irreverent, comic, and sometimes biting images of clergy and their congregations reveal the contested place of religion, both conforming and non-conforming, in eighteenth-century Britain. While satirical attacks on religion and the clergy reach back to antiquity, eighteenth-century graphic artists and their literary counterparts seized on anti-clerical themes with fresh vigor. This seminar examined a range of comic representations of corruption, hypocrisy, and greed that reflect the conflicts and tensions inherent in the challenge of incorporating old and new religious practices and beliefs into the British enlightenment.  

The course was offered in conjunction with the exhibition “Sacred Satire: Lampooning Religious Belief in Eighteenth-Century Britain,” curated by Professor Anderson with Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Lewis Walpole Library. The exhibition opened 22 September 2011.

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May 14, 2011

Hogarth to Cruikshank:  the Comic Image 1750-1850

This year, for the first time, the Library invited members of the community to a one-day version of the popular master class with Professor Maidment and Cynthia Roman.

The number of participants was limited.

This one-day class used the huge collections of caricatures and other comic prints held at the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington as a means of exploring visual humour in the century between 1750 and 1850. During this period, the political caricature first flourished and then withered as the dominant form of visual comedy to be replaced by a broader marketplace for graphic images that reflected the interests of the rapidly changing urban population. The same period saw the overthrow of metal engraving and etching as the primary modes of making reproducible images in favour of wood engraving and lithography.

The class was designed to give a brief overview of these developments using prints drawn from the Lewis Walpole Library collections. Participants spent the day working with primary material from the period. Prints by both well known figures like Hogarth, Gillray and Rowlandson and by relatively obscure jobbing artists and engravers were considered. The teaching was relatively informal and exploratory rather than narrowly didactic. No previous experience of working with prints was required, and participants were encouraged to become engaged in discussion of these images and their possible interpretations.

The class was held in the Lewis Walpole Library's Reading Room, a new development that provides excellent facilities for events of this kind. The class was organised round three primary themes – The Forms of Visual Comedy; Print Making Techniques and their History; and Caricature and Society 1750-1850.

The session on 'Forms of Visual Comedy'l, using both prints and illustrations, tried to define the nature of visual humour in the eighteenth and nineteenth, especially caricature. The class considered terms like 'caricature' and 'cartoon', and thought about the different sorts of humour available to the artist - 'satire', 'invective', 'parody', 'pastiche', 'the grotesque' and 'whimsy' among them. The aim of the session was to introduce the variety of humorous ways of looking suggested by caricatures and other forms of graphic humour from the period. 'Print Making Techniques and their History' offered help with recognising the main print making techniques and their mode of operation, including metal engraving, mezzotint, etching, wood engraving and lithography. There was also some consideration of the social history of each of these reprographic methods to suggest why they enjoyed popularity during particular historical periods. 'Caricature and Society 1750-1850' used a wide variety of images of print shops to suggest ways in which contemporaries viewed the usefulness, dangers or other forms of social impact made by caricature and other forms of comic prints. Why was eighteenth century political and social caricature so free from censorship? Could rudeness be socially useful or even progressively reformist? How widespread or democratic was caricature as a form of social communication? Was caricature almost exclusively the preserve of genteel male sociability, or did large numbers of observers have access to it? Why did political caricature give way to the comedy of urban manners as the primary subject for graphic comedy from the 1820s on? How far can satirical prints be thought of as an early instance of Victorian social self-analysis? Discussion of these kinds of issues shaped this concluding session of the programme.

Brian Maidment is Research Professor in the History of Print at Salford University in Manchester, UK, and has long standing interests in the study of popular graphic traditions as well as a detailed knowledge of the Farmington collections. He has taught classes of this kind at Farmington since 2002. Cynthia Roman is the Lewis Walpole Library's Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings and has extensive experience of working with prints of all levels of aesthetic ambition and achievement.

For a link to Master Class Handouts click here.

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January 28, 2011

Portrait Prints as History

Eighteenth-century British art has long been associated with the prevalence of portrait painting, for better and for worse. While Jonathan Richardson claimed that "a portrait is a sort of general history of the life of the person it represents," the aspiring history painter James Barry would lament the enduring English preference for "portraits of ourselves, of our horses, our dogs, and country seats." But how did a bourgeoning print culture exacerbate or complicate the already fraught tension between portrait and history? How did the efflorescence of caricature in the second half of the century affect British conceptions of portrait likeness and civic virtue? Portrait prints, in close alliance with literary history and biography, deserve renewed attention as bearers of historical meaning. Published for book illustration and issue, with and without text, portrait prints articulated one version of national history as a "gallery" of illustrious historical persons—a visual and literary representation of a sequence of notable individuals. Additionally, straight portraits and caricatures helped to articulate modern forms of subjectivity that relate in compelling ways to the emergence of historical writing in the eighteenth century.

This seminar was led by Douglas Fordham, Assistant Professor of Art History at University of Virginia, and was offered in conjunction with the exhibition "Illustrious Heads: Portrait Prints as History" curated by Cynthia Roman and on display at the Lewis Walpole Library. Additional material from the Library's extensive collections of historical portraits, caricatures, and illustrated books was used to demonstrate the variety of portrait prints published and collected throughout the eighteenth century. The course explored the diverse ways in which portraits were considered as repositories of history, biography, and anecdote. Additional attention was paid to the preoccupations of eighteenth-century audiences with questions of sitter classification, authenticity, provenance, and scarcity.

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October 28, 2010

Literary Techniques in popular scientific biography: A Writer's Experience

Richard Holmes, author of The Age of Wonder, led a seminar for Yale graduate students at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. The seminar included a presentation and discussion and was followed by a reception in the Beinecke Mezzanine.

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The Lewis Walpole Library invites Yale graduate students to spend a week in the country

The Lewis Walpole Library offers two week-long master classes most years. The popular Caricature and the Comic Image 1800-1850, focusing on nineteenth-century prints and graphic images, was most recently held May 16-20, 2011. Another week-long master class, British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century, was introduced in August 2011 and repeated in August 2012.

For more information, please contact Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, 860-677-2140, or cynthia.roman@yale.edu.

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August 20-24, 2012

British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century

taught by Mark Salber Phillips, Professor of History at Carleton University, Ottawa

and

Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings at the Lewis Walpole Library

The Lewis Walpole Library invited graduate students to a week-long master class on history painting in Britain during the long eighteenth century.

The residential seminar was intended to give doctoral students in a number of disciplines the opportunity to consider issues of history painting using both visual material and textual resources from the Lewis Walpole Library's collections. This course explores the often-embattled efforts of artists to construct new modes of visual representations of narrative history and national history in particular. A multidisciplinary approach provided the theoretical context of Enlightenment intellectual history, the more focused discourse of art treatises, and direct encounters with the formal and aesthetic qualities of works of art.

The class was taught as a combination of lecture presentations, discussions, and small-group activities and will include visits to the Yale Center for British Art, the Yale Art Gallery, and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. Most of the teaching took place in the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington and was led by Mark Salber Phillips, Professor of History at Carleton University, Ottawa, and Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings at the Lewis Walpole Library. The number of participants was limited.

For more information, please contact Cynthia Roman, Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Paintings, 860-677-2140, or cynthia.roman@yale.edu.

August 22-26, 2011

British History Painting in the Long Eighteenth Century

The week-long master Class was introduced in 2011.

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May 16-20, 2011

Caricature and the Comic Image 1800-1850

Despite the rather specialised topic suggested by the title, this residential seminar aimed to introduce doctoral students both to the broad interpretative issues raised by studying prints and graphic images and to the range of collections available at the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington.

While the Library has an extremely rich collection of eighteenth-century caricatures and other prints by such well known artists as Hogarth, Gillray, and Rowlandson, it also has a extraordinarily wide range of comic images from the first half of the nineteenth century, images which evolve or re-invent the caricature tradition to bear on social themes, especially the day to day experience of urban life. Less widely studied and reproduced than the caricatures of the late eighteenth century, this corpus of early nineteenth-century prints nonetheless forms an excellent starting place for studying the graphic tradition. As political and personal satire gave way to a focus on wider socio-cultural themes in comic image-making, intaglio engraving was substantially replaced by lithography and wood engraving as the favored media, thus opening up new possibilities in combining printed texts and illustration. These rapid changes in mode and subject combined with a volatile and experimental marketplace to re-define the nature of humor in this period.

The residential seminar was intended to give doctoral students in a number of disciplines the opportunity to work with the Lewis Walpole Library's collections and to think over issues to do with the value, status, and methodological challenges offered by the study of graphic material. No previous experience of working with prints or other graphic images was required. The number of participants was limited.

The class was taught through a number of different small group activities and included visits to both the Yale Center for British Art and the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library in New Haven, and a print studio. Most of the teaching took place in the Lewis Walpole Library in Farmington and was led by Brian Maidment and Cynthia Roman.

For a link to Master Class Handouts click here.

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