IE 5.5 and Netscape 6 setup

Multilanguage support in the Yale Library

Internet Explorer 5.5 (SP1) add some helpful features for our multilanguage support in our NT systems. It adds IME for Hebrew, Arabic and Thai that we can add through Control Panel's Keyboard setting. With those input methods installed (choose custom installation) and proper fonts, we will be able to search the Web with those native language characters, even from right to left display for Arabic and Hebrew. We can also write the multilanguage documents with notepad but without right to left feature. In order to use these new features in Netscape, I had tried upgrade from 4.72 to 4.76 and didn't recognize the new IME as it did for CJK which is not shown in Control Panel's Keyboard list. But after upgrading to Netscape 6, the native language search is available except it is not bi-directonal input/display.
-- last modified on 02/15/2001

IE 5 and Netscape 4.7x setup -- last year's setting for references

Microsoft Internet Explorer Version 5's auto detect capability makes it the best tool for general support of all languages.  For Netscape, the best way obtain general support for all languages is to install one Unicode font such as Bitstream or Arial Unicode MS. In Netscape's Preferences Menu, choose Bitstream or Arial Unicode MS as the font for all languages (such as Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Unicode). These fonts are large. To use a specific font for different language encoding, see following sections. For quick settings, see the samples.

CJK settings:

System support/Acquiring the necessary Fonts: There are CJK language packs that come with NT, they can be installed from the Control Panel. (Add Fonts from the CD under the Langpack directory: Gulin for Korean, Msmincho for Japanese, and MingLiu for Chinese Big5.) An Office 2000 CD is another source of the fonts.

 If you need CJK input, the easiest way to install the necessary CJK fonts and the input method is to do a Custom Installation of IE5, and choose the language fonts and input method during the installation.

 For Netscape version 4.7x, if you want to use Microsoft's CJK input method you have to install IE5 on your machine as described above.

Netscape 4.72 setup:

  1. In Netscape, choose Preferences under Edit, then go to Fonts under Appearance
  2. After choosing Fonts for each Encoding, go to Languages under Navigator, and add the Languages according to the order of your preference.
  3. When you hit a web page that doesn't show the right font, you have to go to Character set under View and choose the correct display language.
  4. To browse a web site in Hebrew, install the fonts, and choose Web HebrewAD and Web Hebrew Monospace for the Western Character Set.  Note: This will replace the Arial MS Unicode, therefore other Unicode languages might not be able to display correctly unless you toggle back and forth between the different display fonts.
  5. To display pages in Arabic or other languages not listed in Netscape, Internet Explorer is your best option.
  6. ** According to Netscape 6 documentation, there will be a feature called "Automatic translation of web pages for access to the global Internet". But Hebrew, Arabic, Korean ... are not in the supported language list yet.
For most update general Unicode settings, see Unicode option in Internet Explorer 4.73

 IE5's setup is much easier; if you just want to read CJK, IE will automatically download the fonts as needed. If you did a Custom setup for IE5 and choose the language fonts and input method, then it should auto detect (don't forget to choose auto detect when you run setup) and use the right font. If you don't see the right fonts, you may have to go to Encoding under View and choose the right Encoding.

 For most update general Unicode settings, see Unicode options in Internet Explorer 5

Here are some sample sites for testing the settings:
 Arabic , Bulgaria , Cambodia (Khmer, image) ,  China , Greek , Hebrew IsraelJapanKorean , Russian, Tamil (need to install the Mylai font), Taiwan , Thai , Ukrainian, more,...
 

More General Cases: Including Office 2000

Window 2000 multilanguage version supports multilanguage, but it will be sold only through Volume Licensing programs such as Microsoft Open License Program (MOLP/Open), Select and Enterprise agreement. See details from the link..

Multi-language set up:

  1. In the Windows Start menu, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click the Regional Settings icon.
  3. On the Input Locales tab, click ADD.
  4. Choose the language you want from dropdown list, and then click Ok.
  5. Repeat the same procedure for each language you want.
For Detailed setup instructions, see Multilanguage support in Windows.

Requirements for Asian, right-to-left, and other types of languages:

Asian languages (Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Korean)
To enter ideographic characters for these languages, you must first install support for the language, and then install the Input Method Editor (IME) for the language.

If the language version of your operating system doesn't match the language you want to type, install a Global Input Method Editor (Global IME). Global IMEs allow you to enter Asian text in Microsoft Word, in Microsoft Outlook e-mail messages, and in Microsoft Internet Explorer. Other Office programs require an Asian operating system or Windows 2000 or language software to allow you to enter Asian text.

 Baltic, Central European, Cyrillic, Greek, and Turkish languages
To enter characters for these languages, use one of the following operating systems:

The corresponding language version of Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000
If you are running a language version of an operating system that doesn't match the language you want to type, install system support for that language.

Right-to-left languages (Arabic, Hebrew, Farsi, and Urdu)
To enter characters for these languages, use one of the following operating systems:

The corresponding language version of Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows NT 4.0

Any language version of Windows 2000
If you are running a language version of Windows 2000 that doesn't match the language you want to type, install system support for that language.

Install system support for multiple languages
System support for multiple languages in Windows NT 4.0 is automatically installed.

Install multilanguage support in Windows 2000
This procedure applies only if you are running a language version of Windows 2000 that doesn't match the language you want to type.
Use this procedure when you want to enter characters for

in Microsoft Office 2000 programs.

  1. In the Windows Start menu, point to Settings, and then click Control Panel.
  2. Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon.
  3. Click the Windows Setup tab.
  4. In the Components list, click Multilanguage Support, and then click Details.
  5. Select the check boxes next to the languages you want to use.
  6. Note: Installing multilanguage support in Windows 95 will disable the euro currency patch if it has been installed. Install the patch again to restore euro currency support.